latifundium

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latifundium

(pl. latifundia) a generic term for a large landed estate in noncapitalist societies. It is a Latin word, referring initially to the large slave estates found in the Roman Empire. These survived in various forms in southern Europe during feudalism, and with the Spanish and Portuguese conquest of Latin America the term, and to some extent the forms of the latifundia, became known as HACIENDA and PLANTATION. The latifundia complex in Latin America often existed with minifundia, small landholdings either on or near the large estates often involved in restrictive tenancy arrangements, but which ensured a labour supply for the large estate.
References in periodicals archive ?
L'attribution aux 'communautes' de la terre des latifundia est, dans la sierra, la solution que reclame le probleme agraire (18).
In many cases, latifundia estates expanded production impressively, while millions of small peasant farms remained mired in poverty and were often dispossessed of their land.
Patterson claimed that in the days of the Romans slaves often preferred the latifundia, plantations where slaves performed backbreaking labor but lived otherwise without surveillance, to the easier life of the household slave.
Notwithstanding its rather negative portrayal of sugar, depicted as the crop that brought latifundia, mass production, slavery, standardization, and foreign exploitation to the island, this study provides a solid foundation to understand the Cuban sugar industry.
The Roman farming estates called latifundia, together with the practice of plowing up and down slopes instead of across (contour plowing), ruined Italian soils.
That the serfs of the latifundia should be the contemporaries of the new proletariat seems to me a perfect formula for an explosive mix from which total revolution will emerge.
Cambridge, 1967 ; Latifundia. Londres, 1967; Roman Farming.
The council certainly recognized the legitimacy of private ownership (Gs-69, 71; Srs-42), but the conviction that this is subordinate to its social character led the council to authorize the seizure of material goods for redistribution in exceptional cases; it explicitly cites the case of the latifundia, whose exploitation was judged contrary to the common good because the proprietors compromised human dignity by paying paltry salaries to their workers or by demanding exorbitant rents from their tenants (Gs-71).
One was the belief that the system of arendasi and labour contracts should be abolished and replaced with a network of rural banks and village cooperatives that would offer the peasants credits to take over parts of the latifundia and eventually render the large landowners obsolete.
The first is the unequal distribution of land, which remains concentrated in the hands of relatively few individuals and families by means of the perpetuation of the latifundia system of large-scale agriculture.
Rome's merchants and independent farmers were turned into landless serfs on the latifundia, the vast land monopolies that Rome's oligarchy accumulated.
Further, the offensive against the latifundia has resumed with several land seizures (or "recoveries"), and new state companies (including joint ventures with state firms from countries like Iran) have been created to produce means of production like tractors.