latitudinarian


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

latitudinarian

of or relating to a school of thought within the Church of England in the 17th century that minimized the importance of divine authority in matters of doctrine and stressed the importance of reason and personal judgment
References in periodicals archive ?
in an important way, splits off into a special category agency efforts to expend resources on economic entitlements through aggressive statutory interpretation from other sorts of ambitious or "latitudinarian" agency actions.
(15.) I owe this interpretation of Mandeville as an Arminian or, in the English context, a Latitudinarian to Arne C.
In Chapter 7 the authors give examples of the Seminary Professor at Maynooth grappling with pedantic matters of Canon Law in the Irish Ecclesiastical Review, but equally of his more latitudinarian approach to the practicalities of episcopal discipline.
Chandler thereby establishes this process as one "deep principle of intelligibility in" what has become the modern "aesthetic and ethical structuring of experience" (330), finding it most thoroughly articulated before the 1780s by Laurence Sterne, albeit in a way that is shown to build powerfully on Adam Smith, Samuel Richardson, and Latitudinarian religiosity.
The correct inquiry, however, is the one suggested by James Madison that runs between the latitudinarian rational basis test favored by Hamilton and the strict necessity standard favored by Jefferson.
A similarly expansive and latitudinarian spirit can be found in letters by a dozen more Jewish American fathers to their sons during the latter half of the eighteenth century and the first quarter of the nineteenth century.
The pursuit of perfection is usually foredoomed, but the Los Angeles City Ethics Commission, which has a latitudinarian understanding of ethical behavior, has a perfectly awful idea.
New alignments formed, composed of the various approaches that had failed to achieve a stable hegemony: "strict construction"-composed of historical, textual and structural elements--vied with a congeries of allegedly more latitudinarian forms--doctrinal, prudential, and ethical methods of interpretation--that its opponents ingenuously decried as "judicial activism." But this simplifying, contrapuntal division made the problem posed by Legal Realism harder, because there was no legal reason to prefer one set of approaches to another beyond the claim that each made that it alone was lawful, on its terms.
Roderick Chisholm, Ernest Sosa, and Michael McKinsey have defended "latitudinarian," "descriptivist," or what this paper calls "liberal" answers to that question.
In light of Eastwood's latitudinarian perspectives on religious belief, which are generally tolerant of all orthodoxies, his ethical vision seems to stem from his canny reconstruction of our culture's predominant Judeo-Christian investiture rather than from any personal avowal of faith.
Else you will secure unity of form at the loss of unity of doctrine, or unity of doctrine at the loss of unity of form; you will have to choose between a comprehension of opinions and a resolution into parties, between latitudinarian and sectarian error."
He observes that it is not so much infected yet by the latitudinarian ethics, liberal guilt complex, aversion to conversion, and capitulation to social forces that plague mainline Protestantism.