laudanum


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Related to laudanum: absinthe, Dilaudid

laudanum

(lôd`ənəm), tincture, or alcoholic solution, of opiumopium,
substance derived by collecting and drying the milky juice in the unripe seed pods of the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum. Opium varies in color from yellow to dark brown and has a characteristic odor and a bitter taste.
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, first compounded by Paracelsus in the 16th cent. Not then known to be addictive, the preparation was widely used up through the 19th cent. to treat a variety of disorders. Many literary and artistic figures, including Coleridge, Poe, Moussorgsky, and De Quincey, are known to have been addicted.

laudanum

1. a tincture of opium
2. (formerly) any medicine of which opium was the main ingredient
References in periodicals archive ?
Lady Laudanum, Grande Dame of the Underworld and CEO of Bare Bones Tours plc headed the carnival parade herself, in an unprecedented appearance this side of the River Styx.
Thomas de Quincey's Confessions of an English Opium Eater was published in 1821 and details the author's descent into dependence on laudanum, a form of opium.
hopelessly addicted to laudanum they had first sampled in Civil War field hospitals.
Nellie Pope was so unhinged by the sentence that she arrived in Jackson for registration drunk with laudanum.
Begone," bellowed Mr Patel before turning to one of the old dears and asking: "Your usual file of laudanum, Mrs Trickett?
Opium, often in the form of liquid laudanum, was prescribed for numerous complaints from insomnia toothache.
I think it's a remnant of the patent-medicine era, when so-called snake oil salesmen peddled various cure-alls that were typically just water or alcohol laced with laudanum, cocaine, or something truly bizarre (or nothing at all).
This was a much more peaceful country when marijuana and coca leaves and laudanum could be freely purchased by adults in America's pharmacies and grocery stores, from 1620 to at least 1916, the way we buy beer and wine and coffee today.
Abraham Wood took laudanum to keep him awake during a 24 hour walking race in London in 1807 and competitors in six day bicycle races in America in the late 19th century took nitroglycerine to stimulate the heart.
Laudanum was a 10 percent solution of opium powder in alcohol, widely used to treat everything from pain and insomnia to female disorders.
We're leaving behind our laudanum, legionnaire, chimbley sweep-referencing ways.
She] replied jokingly that [she] was not even thinking of Laudanum & the truth--that [she] thought the Draught spoilt, which caused [her] inquiry.