launch


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launch

1. a motor driven boat used chiefly as a transport boat
2. the largest of the boats of a man-of-war

launch

[lȯnch]
(aerospace engineering)
To send off a rocket vehicle under its own rocket power, as in the case of guided aircraft rockets, artillery rockets, and space vehicles.
To send off a missile or aircraft by means of a catapult or by means of inertial force, as in the release of a bomb from a flying aircraft.
To give a space probe an added boost for flight into space just before separation from its launch vehicle.

launch

i. To send off a missile, such as if an aircraft launched an air-to-air missile against its adversary.
ii. To send the aircraft on a specific task as a mission was launched.

launch

To cause an application to load and run. Contrast with "exit" or "close," which ends the program. See launcher and never say.
References in periodicals archive ?
Orbital Sciences Corporation (NYSE:ORB) today announced that it is in final preparations to launch the Space Technology 5 (ST5) scientific spacecraft for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aboard the company's Pegasus(R) rocket.
Telesat will launch its Nimiq 4 satellite in 2008, for its fifth flight with ILS.
Kiyoshi Isozaki, president and CEO of JSAT Corporation, said: "We chose the ILS Proton because it has the demonstrated reliability and launch tempo that JSAT established as criteria for the JCSAT-11 program.
Air Force requirements for the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV).
This successful launch gives us great confidence that the satellite will meet its performance objectives.
Martin Halliwell, SES ASTRA chief technology officer, said: "This is the first time that SES ASTRA chose an Atlas rocket for the launch of a new satellite.
On numerous occasions, Orbital has been the provider of a mission's small satellite and small-class space launch vehicle, as will be the case for the ST8 mission.
If the February launch occurs, it will come nearly a year after SpaceX's maiden launch in March 2006 when the Falcon 1 exploded in the air.
Only one more launch remained before SWAS could hitch a ride on the rocket, and Melnick and his team began to "get out of hibernation," retesting software for their instrument.
While the United States has made accidental nuclear strikes more and more difficult by complicating the launch sequence, Russia has delegated that authority among various competing political forces and invested its safety in a beyond-the-grave automatic firing mechanism.
The QuickReach rocket would be carried aloft by an airplane to its launch area, then dropped to fire its rocket motor and fly into space carrying a satellite.
And this year, NASA, having been roundly criticized during the Challenger aftermath for consciously leaving itself no choice but to launch all its eggs in one basket, came to the same decision.