launder


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launder

[′lȯn·dər]
(engineering)
An inclined channel or trough for the conveyance of a liquid, such as for water in mining and construction engineering or for molten metal.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is unacceptable and Pakistan should demand the UK and EU to catch the criminals, stop such facilities for money laundering and also help in returning the laundered stolen money back to Pakistan.
A total of Rs6 billion was laundered via these four fake or benami' accounts.
Paulino described Launder as an excellent tree trimmer, and deputies found no malfunction with Launder's equipment.
"However, the ring is not seen as a good place to launder money.
(23) A criminal syndicate could either sell counterfeit goods or pirate DVDs and subsequently launder the proceeds, or use laundered funds to purchase these goods through the informal market.
Registered or not, entering into an arrangement to launder money is a serious criminal offence (far more serious than neglecting to register) and there is no de minimis limit.
The oft-cited figure from the United Nations that the illegal drug trade, at the international level, generates $400-$500 billion annually (8 percent of total trade flows) also implies that the amounts laundered are massive.
Field laundering: Field launder the patrol bag, the intermediate cold weather bag and the bivy cover using formula II in Appendix E of FM 42-414, Tactics, Techniques and Procedures for Quartermaster Field Service Company, Direct Support,
'The intent of the Patriot Act and the desire of the Treasury Department is to protect the financial system from infiltration by those who would launder money to hide criminal actions or to finance terror," said Taylor Griffin, U.S.
Fraudsters use two methods to launder funds in a legitimate business.
The Jersey City, New Jersey, native, who was featured in a Black Enterprise cover story, "Top Blacks on Wall Street" (October 1996), was recently operating as an independent investment counselor before allegedly striking an agreement with an undercover agent to launder $16 million over the course of a year in exchange for a 25% cut.