Lavatera

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Lavatera

 

(tree mallow), a genus of herbs, shrubs, and, less commonly, trees of the family Malvaceae. The leaves are deeply lobed. The flowers, which are on pedicels, are solitary, axial, or in terminal racemose or spicate inflorescences. The epicalyx consists of several bractlets that are concresced at the base. The corolla is pink, purple, or, less commonly, yellow. The fruits, which are small, monospermous, and indehiscent, are arranged in a regular circle.

There are about 25 species, distributed mainly in the Mediterranean region. The USSR has three species. L. thuringiaca has large pink flowers in a loose raceme; it is found in the southern part of the forest zone, in the forest-steppe zone, in the steppe zone, and—less commonly—in the mountains. L. trimestris, an annual reaching 100 cm in height, has large (up to 6 cm across) pink (of various shades) or white flowers. Certain shrubby and arborescent forms are cultivated in greenhouses.

References in periodicals archive ?
Lavatera is a form of tree mallow, a sub-shrub which is generally hardy and often evergreen.
Varieties of Lavatera trimestris are smaller and include some fine flower forms with deeply cut veins.
Several curiosities have been discovered by lavatera fanciers - a form with small, frilly-edged flowers, called Pink Frills, and some with variegated foliage, green blotched with white or yellow, as in Wembdon Variegated and Chrisjen.
British meadows and hedgerows are brightened every summer by the pink flowers of common mallow, but it is only in recent years that the plant's close relation, lavatera, has become a knock-out in gardens.
Several curiosities have been discovered by lavatera fanciers - a form with small, frilly-edged flowers, called Pink Frills; and variegated foliage blotched white and yellow, as in Wembdon Variegated and Chrisjen, a sport of Barnsley, though both of these must be watched for reversion to plain green leaves.
Lavateras require rich, well-drained soilto perform best.
Imagine a laid-back hollyhock and you'llhave a pretty good idea of lavatera (more specifically, Lavatera trimestris).
Shrubs that should be pruned by this method include buddleia, davidii, caryopteris, ceanothus `Autumnal Blue', cotinuus (smoke bush), forsythia, hydrangea and lavatera.
Lavateras have no real preference for soil type although they are happiest in a sheltered, sunny position.
Lavatera Rosea, seen here, is one of those unsung heroes of the garden.
Lavatera, also known as tree mallows, range in colour from white to mauve.
Q I HAVE a large lavatera bush that has grown too big for its position.