lavender

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lavender,

common name for any plant of the genus Lavandula, herbs or shrubby plants of the family Labiatae (mintmint,
in botany, common name for members of the Labiatae, a large family of chiefly annual or perennial herbs. Several species are shrubby or climbing forms or, rarely, small trees.
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 family), most of which are native to the Mediterranean region but naturalized elsewhere. The true lavender (L. officinalis) has grayish foliage and small blue or pale purplish flowers (white in one variety). It is popular for herb gardens and is cultivated commercially (chiefly in France and England) or, more commonly, gathered wild (in S Europe) for the fragrant flowers, valued for scenting linens and clothes and as the source of oil of lavender. The oil is distilled for use in perfumery, in toilet preparations (e.g., lavender water). Lavender is sometimes used as a flavoring. Spike lavender (L. latifolia), a broader-leaved, less fragrant species, yields spike-lavender oil, which is also used in perfumery and in varnishes and porcelain painting. Lavender is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Lamiales, family Labiatae.
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lavender

lavender

39 Species with varying leaf shapes, in the mint family, so all are edible. The pretty sweet, spicy, perfumed flowers are edible. Great in sweet and savory dishes, custards, etc. For stress, headache, intestinal gas, rheumatism psoriasis. Protects fabrics and clothes from moths.
Edible Plant Guide © 2012 Markus Rothkranz

lavender

1. any of various perennial shrubs or herbaceous plants of the genus Lavandula, esp L. vera, cultivated for its mauve or blue flowers and as the source of a fragrant oil (oil of lavender): family Lamiaceae (labiates)
2. the dried parts of L. vera, used to perfume clothes
3. a pale or light bluish-purple to a very pale violet colour
4. perfume scented with lavender
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The lavender oil is commonly used in aromatherapy and massage therapy (Welsh 1995).
Although silexan is currently the only pharmaceutical quality lavender oil preparation for oral use (Kasper et al.
This could decrease the stimulation of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation, implying that lavender oil possesses strong antioxidant property.
Briefly, 60 min after the silexan and lavender oils inhalation, each animal was placed individually in the center of the maze and subjected to working and reference memory tasks, in which same 5 arms (nos.
The maximal antidepressant action by lavender oils was obtained for L01.
These results strongly suggest positive effects of the lavender oils on short-term memory.
The main components of the lavender oil (Aromarant Co., Ltd., Rottingen, Germany), as determined by gas chromatography, were [11] linalyl acetate (38.5%), linalool (33.3%), caryophyllene (3.9%), myrcene (3.9%), trans-ocimene (2.4%), lavandulyl acetate (2.2%), and terpinen-4-ol (2.1%).
This study assessed the effects of inhalation of linalyl acetate and lavender oil on pain relief and urinary symptoms following the removal of indwelling urinary catheters from patients who underwent CRC surgery.
For example, inhalation of lavender oil containing 35.35% linalyl acetate as its main component relieved migraine headaches [15]; inhalation of neroli oil containing 19.5% linalyl acetate [16] and inhalation of Lavandula hybrida Reverchon cv.
The use of lavender oil by oral intake, inhalation or topical application for the treatment of anxiety and improvement of sleep quality as well as an agent with calming, mood enhancing, spasmolytic, antihypertensive, antimicrobial, analgesic and wound healing effects has a long tradition (Sasannejad et al.
Although the medical use of lavender oil is well established and steadily growing, knowledge on its pharmacological mechanism of action is still limited.
The present investigations were initiated by speculations that lavender oil may possess benzodiazepine-like action on GAB[A.sub.A] receptors (Huang et al.