law of storms

law of storms

[′lȯ əv ′stȯrmz]
(meteorology)
Historically, the general statement of the manner in which the winds of a cyclone rotate about the cyclone's center, and the way that the entire disturbance moves over the earth's surface.
References in classic literature ?
All night long, and every night, on this canal, there was a perfect storm and tempest of spitting; and once my coat, being in the very centre of the hurricane sustained by five gentlemen (which moved vertically, strictly carrying out Reid's Theory of the Law of Storms), I was fain the next morning to lay it on the deck, and rub it down with fair water before it was in a condition to be worn again.
"The Law of Storms: The True Story of the RMS Rhone and the Great Virgin Islands Hurricane of 1867" is a nonfiction narrative centering on the story of a luxurious passenger steamship that crashed and sank in a hurricane in the British Virgin Islands (BVI) 150 years ago.
I began writing "The Law of Storms" when I was a Nieman Fellow in 2007-08, but the Nieman connection to this project actually goes back much further.