zeroth law of thermodynamics

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zeroth law of thermodynamics

[¦zir‚ōth ‚lȯ əv ‚thər·mō·dī′nam·iks]
(thermodynamics)
A law that if two systems are separately found to be in thermal equilibrium with a third system, the first two systems are in thermal equilibrium with each other, that is, all three systems are at the same temperature.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Utilizing (14) and (28), the first law of thermodynamics yields
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It's a law of thermodynamics, and no one has ever witnessed a sustained violation of it.