zeroth law of thermodynamics

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zeroth law of thermodynamics

[¦zir‚ōth ‚lȯ əv ‚thər·mō·dī′nam·iks]
(thermodynamics)
A law that if two systems are separately found to be in thermal equilibrium with a third system, the first two systems are in thermal equilibrium with each other, that is, all three systems are at the same temperature.
References in periodicals archive ?
11) William Thomson (Lord Kelvin) is generally credited with formulating the First Law of Thermodynamics in its present form.
Computations of pressure losses, work losses, efficiency and power of the processes revealed by the new PV/Px diagrams are draw using the first law of thermodynamics for processes with finite speed (Florea et al.
In this article, I argue that the second law of thermodynamics is of special importance even within the domain of the humanist, especially in the evolution of culture.
It is for this reason that I have been urging that work entrained by whatever purposes in view of the workers, is most fundamentally entrained by the Second Law of thermodynamics in the role of its ultimate final cause of all activity (Salthe, 1993, 2002b, 20003, 2004).
The second law of thermodynamics and common sense indicate that there are limits on how many times a piece of paper can be recycled.
CAFE: Stick to the issue and eliminate hyperbole such as the second law of thermodynamics comment.
To not know the second law of thermodynamics for physics is not to know Shakespeare if you're studying English,'' the pedagogue informed his students.
It is well justified to delete the attribute "seemingly" because the Third Law of Thermodynamics, enunciated by Nernst in 1906 (19), implies the unattainability of absolute zero.
Sceptical experts point out that the first law of thermodynamics states that you can't get out more energy than you put in.
But after the mid-nineteenth century, when the intuition that things wear out was codified as the second law of thermodynamics, this position became untenable.
Carnot's principle, the basis of what is now known as the Second Law of Thermodynamics, states that the motive force of a heat engine "is fixed by the temperature of the bodies between which, in the last analysis, heat is transported.