Lawgiving

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Lawgiving

See also Justice.
Draco
(fl. 621 B.C.) codified Athenian law. [Gk. Hist.: Benét, 286]
Hammurabi
Babylonian king (c. 1800 B.C.); established first systematic legal code. [Classical Hist.: EB, 8: 598–599]
Justinian
(485–565) ruler of eastern empire; codified Roman law. [Rom. Hist.: EB, 10: 362–365]
Minos
scrupulous king and lawgiver of Crete. [Gk. Myth.: Wheeler, 244]
Moses
presents God’s ten commandments to Israelites. [O.T.: Exodus 20:1–12]
Solon
(c. 639–c. 559 B.C.) Athenian statesman and wise legislator. [Gk. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1018]
Talmud
great body of Jewish law and tradition, supplementing scripture. [Judaism: Haydn & Fuller, 725]
References in periodicals archive ?
How comes it, Stranger, that we are ruling that it makes no difference to the thief whether the thing he steals be great or small, and whether the place it is stolen from be holy or unhallowed, or whatever other differences may exist in a theft; whereas the lawgiver ought to suit the punishment to the crime by inflicting dissimilar penalties in these varying cases?
With the Sermon on the Mount, Matthew presents Jesus as a new Moses, not as the lawgiver but a guide who shows the way to a life full of blessing.
He arranged for a vision in which Moses, the Lawgiver, and Elija, the prophet, appeared with Him.
He is described on the site as a Hebrew prophet and lawgiver, who transformed a wandering people into a nation and received the Ten Commandments.
I turn now to The Federalist's treatment of another facet of the question of how governments are made: the theme referred to in the 18th century as the lawgiver, which we today usually call the founder.
For F., God in the book of Genesis is creator; in Exodus, liberator and lawgiver; in Leviticus, holy; in Numbers, absolute authority; and in Deuteronomy, rock.
While natural law theories may hold that the obligatoriness of morality comes with the territory--that moral rightness implies obligation--divine command theories conceive obligation as requiring a lawgiver, whose authority is attested in the possibility of sanctions.
Al-haqq means an interest of an individual or society or of both together established by the Lawgiver, the Wise.
Among them are the Romanization of Commagene, local identities, and the letter; languages, cultural identities, and elites; Jesus as the ever-living lawgiver; a plea in favor of Semitic influence; Greek philosophy in it; and consolation from prison by Mara and Boethius.
Does a man remain free while obeying laws he has not written himself but which are entirely suitable to him (because they are the laws of his nature), or is it that he must be the actual lawgiver for him to be considered free?
but rather the intent of the lawgiver. Nor is it implied dispensation, but rather the application of law in a particular case." It is law, he says, that is "tempered with the principles of natural justice."
The Lawgiver, a new novel by the 97-year-old, Pulitzer Prize--winning novelist Herman Wouk, is about a new novel that fails to get written by a 97-year-old, Pulitzer Prize--winning novelist named Herman Wouk.