lawsonite


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lawsonite

[′lȯs·ən‚īt]
(mineralogy)
CaAl2(Si2O7)(OH)2·H2O A colorless or grayish-blue mineral crystallizing in the orthorhombic system; found in gneisses and schists.
References in periodicals archive ?
Petrology and geochemistry of the lawsonite (pseudomorph)-bearing eclogite in Yuka terrane, North Qaidam UHPM belt: An eclogite facies metamorphosed oceanic slice.
It consists of metagabroic rocks, garnet amphibolites, amphibole schists, quartz-sericite schists and quartzites of medium- to low-pressure, as well as lawsonite and glaucophane schists and eclogites of high pressure and serpentinized ultramafic rocks (Maya and Gonzalez, 1995).
In the metabasites, Ab porphyroblasts can also represent pseudomorphs after lawsonite, given the abundance of Ca-rich minerals included.
Lawsonite blueschist in northern Qilian, NW China: P-T pseudosections and petrologic implications, Journal of Asian Earth Sciences.
The rare Ca-Al silicate species is totally California; described in 1895 from its type locality on the Tiburon Peninsula, Marin County, lawsonite has not since been found in noteworthy crystal specimens anywhere else in the world.
Comment on Redistribution of trace elements during prograde metamorphism from lawsonite blueschist to eclogite facies; implications for deep subduction-zone processes by C.
Additional complications can arise from the presence of compounds such as nahcolite and lawsonite that decompose at temperatures below 450 [degrees]C leading to alterations of total porosity and pore pressure in a complex manner.
Comment on "Redistribution of trace elements during prograde metamorphism from lawsonite blueschist to eclogite facies; implications for deep subduction-zone processes" by C.
The calcium-aluminum silicate lawsonite was originally described from a crystalline schist which is associated with serpentine on the Tiburon Peninsula, Marin County, California.
Relationship to other species: It is the Sr-dominant analogue of lawsonite, the Al-dominant analogue of hennomartinite and the Sr- and Al-dominant analogue of noelbensonite.