laxative


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laxative,

drug or other substance used to stimulate the action of the intestines in eliminating waste from the body. The term laxative usually refers to a mild-acting substance; substances of increasingly drastic action are known as cathartics, purgatives, hydrogogues, and drastics, respectively. Laxatives or cathartics fall into three general categories: irritants that stimulate the muscular action of the intestines (cascara, phenolphthalein, senna); compounds that increase the amount of bulk in the intestines either by withdrawing water from the body (salines such as Epsom salts, citrate of magnesia) or by increasing the bulk when combined with fluids (agar-agar, bran, the various cellulose substances); and lubricants such as mineral oil, which ease the passage of waste and counteract excessive drying of the intestinal contents. Frequent or regular use of cathartics may seriously disrupt the natural digestive processes. When food and even waste products are forced out of the intestinal tract too rapidly, the body is deprived of vital substances, including the nutrients absorbed in the small intestine and the water, vitamins, and minerals extracted from the waste matter in the large intestine. Vitamins A and D, which are soluble in oil, are removed from the body even when the least irritating laxative, mineral oil, is taken. In addition to disrupting digestive and nutritional processes, laxatives reinforce the condition they are intended to overcome. When the intestines are purged, it may be several days before they can fill again with sufficient waste to induce natural elimination. The harm can be perpetuated by frequent use aimed at forcing daily elimination. The response to laxatives is soon lessened, so that larger and more frequent doses may become necessary. Laxatives should be avoided especially when there is abdominal pain. An inflamed appendix may rupture after the use of a laxative. See constipationconstipation,
infrequent or difficult passage of feces. Constipation may be caused by the lack of adequate roughage or fluid in the diet, prolonged physical inactivity, certain drugs, or emotional disturbance.
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laxative

[′lak·səd·iv]
(pharmacology)
An agent that stimulates bowel movement and relieves constipation.

laxative

an agent stimulating evacuation of faeces
References in periodicals archive ?
If your doctor has prescribed a liquid laxative, it may have an unpleasant taste that's difficult to get down; ask your doctor what can be mixed with the laxative to improve the taste.
TOP LAXATIVE TABLET/POWDER BRANDS MARGIN COMPARISON BY CHANNEL Mass Food Drug MIRALAX 21% 30% 36% DULCOLAX 23% 32% 40% COLACE 34% 39% 44% FLEET 34% 38% 46% EX-LAX 25% 34% 43% PHILLIPS' 25% 32% 39% Source: Competitive Promotion Report Note: Table made from bar graph.
Ask your pharmacist for further advice if you're still unsure how to take the laxative.
Indeed, misuse of laxative drugs appears to be highly prevalent in the global population (Austin et al.
Decolorization is the process of removing laxative constituents from aloe vera raw materials during processing.
Although not strictly a laxative, a new drug that blocks the effects of opioids on the gastrointestinal tract also will be described.
It turned out to be a laxative, explained defending solicitor Stephen Edwards.
In an attempt to control his weight, Richard, who lives in Borth, Ceredigion, has used laxatives and exercise to allow him to binge on the junk foods he has craved since 2007.
The search also revealed empty packaging for hundreds of laxative pills and two bloody syringes (without needles) that the patient had used to aspirate blood from her IV lines and to inject into her Foley catheter and the Foley catheter balloon.
Prucalopride has been preliminarily recommended as a clinically and cost effective treatment for women with chronic constipation who have failed to achieve adequate relief from at least two prior laxative treatments, said professor Peter Littlejohns, Clinical and Public Health director at NICE.
Pharmaceutical company Mylan Inc (Nasdaq:MYL) declared on Wednesday its subsidiary Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc's receipt of final approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) for Polyethylene Glycol 3350, Sodium Chloride, Sodium Bicarbonate and Potassium Chloride for Oral Solution (with Flavor Packs) for laxative use.
A recent high-quality RCT compared the osmotic laxative polyethylene glycol 3350 plus electrolytes (PEG + E) with placebo in 51 children with CFC, 2 to 11 years of age.