lay figure


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lay figure

an artist's jointed dummy, used in place of a live model, esp for studying effects of drapery

Lay Figure

 

a wooden doll with movable arms and legs used by artists for sketching clothing and various human poses.

References in periodicals archive ?
Phelps extends Gaskell's use of the term "lay figure" from simply the jointed wooden figure used by artists, employing additionally the figurative meaning that a lay figure is one of little importance, a non-entity.
For this superb show (which ran first at the Fitzwilliam Museum before moving to the Musee Bourdelle in Paris) was concerned above all with the liveliness of the lifeless, giving a startling account of artists' mannequins or lay figures that ranged from Fra Bartolommeo and Poussin by way of Degas and Kokoschka to the Chapman brothers.
The stuffed lay figure that was displaced by the fashion mannequin takes its final bow in Oskar Kokoschka's drawings of the life-size doll he had made in Munich in 1918 as a replacement for his ex-lover Alma Mahler.
The Orthodox Gathering called on the church's next patriarch to develop a framework that would allow the sect's religious and lay figures to share decision-making.
Recalling that long-ago meeting of our reading group, I recognized with dismay the same sort of behaviour when it reared its head here--snide putdowns of bishops and clergy and other lay figures (none of them present, of course) who do not share Voris' (and their) stridency of conviction and willingness to speak up.
We do not know yet if they are religious or lay figures. But we will focus on their abilities as well as influence."
But before any announcement can be made, he must test the water by speaking to leading clerical and lay figures throughout the Arch-Diocese.