laity

(redirected from lay people)
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Related to lay people: Lay person, in layman's terms

laity

laymen, as distinguished from clergymen
References in periodicals archive ?
She said she's constantly trying to find ways to make it easier, like getting a bed on campus where lay people can sleep.
A survey of religious was conducted in November, and one for lay people is being prepared.
Making electronic heart stimulators available in public facilities and training lay people there how to operate them can boost the chances of survival for people who suffer cardiac arrest--a loss of pulse-in such places, according to new findings.
Throughout his 40 years in the profession, Kess has lectured on tax, financial planning and estate planning to more than 700,000 CPAs and lay people.
The rise of the CPF corresponded to significant changes in the Roman Catholic Church, and CPF protest in many ways stands as a measure of how Catholic lay people interpreted and adapted to those changes.
He also wants to reserve some of the cash to expand a scheme which allows clergy to be helped in their ministry by lay people.
During those years a remarkable group of priests and lay people gathered around Clonard.
A PRIEST in the parish where paedophile Fr Eugene Greene last served sparked anger yesterday saying lay people, not priests, were behind sex abuse there.
Rather, it aims at highlighting and exploring what, at first sight, seems to be an important shift in the epistemological orientation of Bourdieu' s work or, more precisely, a tension between two distinct positions that he has simultaneously taken about the construction of sociological knowledge and its usefulness for lay people.
Clara Greed provides a broad introduction to the world of urban planning for students and lay people alike.
On some of the problems he discusses (contraception, abortion, and homosexuality) Catholics, both clergy and lay people, have already voted with their feet by doing and saying what seemed right to them regardless of their infallible monarch.
In particular, lay people seemed willing to accept clerical irregularities, such as priests living with housekeepers or female servants and siring illegitimate children.