layer depth


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layer depth

[′lā·ər ‚depth]
(oceanography)
The thickness of the mixed layer in an ocean.
The depth to the top of the thermocline.
References in periodicals archive ?
Denning, "Estimates of North American summertime planetary boundary layer depths derived from space-borne lidar," Journal of Geophysical Research D: Atmospheres, vol.
When the rotational speed of the cold roll-beating is 1428 r/min and 1581 r/min, the residual compressive stress layer depth significantly increases.
It cannot be observed any difference between Layer Depth labels.
These variables (elevation, active layer depth, soil conductivity, and organic layer depth) did not differ between seeded and unseeded sites in lowland tundra.
Figure 13(c) displays the simulated mixed layer depth (MLD) to compare with the observed chlorophyll (Figure 14(c)) during June 2006.
When the voltage was 27 kV, irradiation was 25 times, and the plating thickness was 1 [micro]m, because of the higher accelerating voltage and thinner plating Cr layer, the molten layer coating was about 3.5 [micro]m depth and grain refinement layer depth was about 3.8 [micro]m.
Changes in surface layer depth can affect air-sea exchange, and carbon and heat storage in the ocean.
The horizontally fractured layer depth ranges from 28.8 to 129.5 m below ground level (CGWB, 1993).
The mean wind speed during the measurement was 2.8 m [s.sup.-1] and the corresponding estimated Ekman layer depth was 2.5 m.
In all three cases, a significant increase of the combination layer depth was noticed for the sulphuretted hydrogen in the luminescent discharge.