lazy eight

lazy eight

lazy eight
An aerobatic maneuver in which the aircraft nose makes a figure 8. The maneuver consists of two 180° turns in opposite directions. During the first 90° arc of each turn, the nose of the aircraft describes a climbing and then descending path above the horizon. During the second 90° arc of each turn, the nose of the aircraft describes a descending and then a climbing path below the horizon. As viewed from the side, the maneuver traces a figure 8. The horizon bisects the 8 from one end to the other.
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The designs include a sunrise over a tsunami, a cat's eye, a Celtic cross, the milky way, a shapely vamp in a tight blue dress, a colorful cartoon character, a tiki totem, a few choice words, a bald eagle, a black panther, a coiled king cobra, a yin yang, the lazy eight symbol for infinity, a crowned lion of Judah and a Native American warrior astride a bony palomino.
It was a thrilling experience as our pilot performed "Lazy Eight" loops (www.fantasyofflight.com).
As the tech sergeant ran for his Crew Chief, airman Niedermayer quickly signaled the "lazy eight" fire signal to the pilot.
'You couldn't be more wrong,' says Haradon Beatty of San Francisco's Lazy Eight Foundation, an organisation which aims to promote original thinking.
But the key in flying the lazy eight to commercial standards is making continuous, but very small, changes in bank and pitch.
There's no rapid, big change in a properly flown lazy eight. In part, this is an attempt to teach pilots to avoid rolling Gs.
They know--or have a pretty good idea--that lazy eights and chandelles have little practical application in the flight levels, with steep spirals and steep turns important only when you want to be on the ground right now.
The AFH, last updated in 2004, is also great for flight reviews, instruction and commercial maneuvers (lazy eights, steep spirals, and the like).
(If you can envision a situation in which your life depends on being able to fly lazy eights to airman certification standards, by all means write in to describe it, as we can't.) This raises the question: Having once done them well enough to persuade an examiner to issue a certificate, is there any reason to go on spending flight time and the money it represents maintaining those elusive skills?
Out in the practice area, [V.sub.A] often is used as the target speed for entering maneuvers like accelerated stalls, chandelles and lazy eights, although some manufacturers may publish a different speed.
The PTS for the Commercial Pilot-Airplane certificate include a number of maneuvers unique to this pilot certificate: Chandelles, Lazy Eights, Eights on Pylons, Steep Spirals and Power-off 180-degree Accuracy Approach and Landings.