lead pigments

lead pigments

[′led ′pig·məns]
(chemistry)
Chemical compounds of lead used in paints to give color; examples are white lead; basic lead carbonate; lead carbonate; lead thiosulfate; lead sulfide; basic lead sulfate (sublimed white lead); silicate white lead; basic lead silicate; lead chromate; basic lead chromate; lead oxychloride; and lead oxide (monoxide and dioxide).
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The two studies presented here, the CDPH data about lead contamination of candy and our study of lead pigments in purses, show similar results.
The Santa Clara, California proceeding was initiated in March 2000 by 10 counties and cities in the state and asserted a claim for public nuisance, alleging that the presence of lead pigments for use in paints and coatings in, on and around residences in the plaintiffs' jurisdictions constitutes a public nuisance.
The agency's backing of the application had been criticized by some coatings trade associations in Europe as well as prominent multi-national pigment and coatings producers supporting a voluntary ban on the use of lead pigments.
The implications of the appellate court's ruling means that plaintiffs in Wisconsin with claims that accrued prior to 2011 may now proceed against historical producers and suppliers of lead pigments without evidence of product identification based solely upon defendants' share of the historical lead paint market.
The most widespread remaining source for children, workers and others is lead paints, that is paints that contain lead pigments, lead drying agents and/or other applications.
As well as giving the paint its tint, lead pigments are highly opaque, so that a relatively small amount of the compound can cover a large area.
"They are being subjected to lab tests to validate if the lead pigments are there.
The purpose of using frit is to lead pigments to interact with frit at fusion treatment temperature and to disperse.
Whilst the UK voluntarily removed lead pigments from consumer paints many years ago, there is currently an ongoing campaign by the United Nations (UN) and World Health Organisation (WHO) to ban the use of lead in industrial paints due to health hazards.
According to the American Coatings Association, industry consensus standards limiting the use of lead pigments date back to the 1950s, when manufacturers led a voluntary effort to remove lead from house paints.
The complaint forced the firm to eliminate the use of lead pigments and dispose of the bulbs as hazardous waste.
In a case brought by the Rhode Island attorney general, a jury recently found that the "cumulative presence of lead pigments" in the state constituted a public nuisance, and therefore held three alleged former lead pigment manufacturers liable for the costs of abating lead paint from private residential buildings throughout the state.