lead-cooled reactor

lead-cooled reactor

[′led ‚küld rē‚ak·tər]
(nucleonics)
A nuclear reactor that uses molten lead as the coolant, to transport the energy released in the fission process away from the fuel rods in the reactor core and to keep the fuel rods and their clad from overheating.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the small, lead-cooled reactor could be placed inside a shipping container measuring about 6.1 metres long and 2.6 metres high, it would be able to generate 10 megawatts of heat, which, if converted into - electricity, would be enough to power some 50,000 households.
The lead-cooled reactor is part of China's efforts to develop new-generation reactors for its rapidly expanding nuclear energy sector.
As the SSTAR concept has been developed, a parallel effort in Europe is being pursued to design a larger (600 MW) lead-cooled reactor system for central station electricity generation.