leaf mould


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leaf mould

a nitrogen-rich material consisting of decayed leaves, etc., used as a fertilizer
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
British broadleaf trees make the best leaf mould and acers make the worst, so you should simply compost acer leaves in the normal way.
Last year's leaf mould is used now as a mulch and, as I spread it around the crowns of dormant plants, I'm treated to a few reassuring glimpses of first stirrings - signs that preparations for new beginnings are under way.
There are many mulches from organic manures and garden compost to bark chippings, straw and leaf mould.
Continue to gather any remaining fallen leaves and add them to your leaf mould pile.
Gather them separately to make leaf mould. (I might be allowed to write more about leaf mould on a future occasion!)
Still mulch to do Collect leaves to make leaf mould. It can be used in potting compost and as mulch.
And for people wondering what to do with piles of fallen leaves this autumn, one possibility is to make a leaf mould that can be used in place of peat as a potting compost for container plants.
Leaf mould is best for older plants, especially woodland plants.
Pine needles are worth gathering and placing in a separate leaf mould pile as they produce acidic leaf mould, which is ideal for mulching ericaceous plants, such as rhododendrons, azaleas, camellias, Pieris and blueberries.
It is part of the organic regime in our garden - it is self-sustaining and leaf mould, which improves soil texture and helps retain moisture, is an important constituent.
Clear fallen leaves and save them to make leaf mould, to use as mulch.