leaf mould


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

leaf mould

a nitrogen-rich material consisting of decayed leaves, etc., used as a fertilizer
References in periodicals archive ?
However, you'll probably need up to two years to make good leaf mould.
British broadleaf trees make the best leaf mould and acers make the worst, so you should simply compost acer leaves in the normal way.
Last year's leaf mould is used now as a mulch and, as I spread it around the crowns of dormant plants, I'm treated to a few reassuring glimpses of first stirrings - signs that preparations for new beginnings are under way.
Still mulch to do Collect leaves to make leaf mould.
And for people wondering what to do with piles of fallen leaves this autumn, one possibility is to make a leaf mould that can be used in place of peat as a potting compost for container plants.
You can make special compost out of leaves which is called leaf mould, says the Royal Horticultural Society.
Pine needles are worth gathering and placing in a separate leaf mould pile as they produce acidic leaf mould, which is ideal for mulching ericaceous plants, such as rhododendrons, azaleas, camellias, Pieris and blueberries.
It is part of the organic regime in our garden - it is self-sustaining and leaf mould, which improves soil texture and helps retain moisture, is an important constituent.
Clear fallen leaves and save them to make leaf mould, to use as mulch.
It can be made out of organic ingredients such as leaf mould, coir and loam.