leakage radiation

leakage radiation

[′lēk·ij ‚rād·ē′ā·shən]
(electromagnetism)
In a radio transmitting system, radiation from anything other than the intended radiating system.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The field leakage radiation can be reduced by decreasing the width of the vertical slot.
As shown in Figure 12(b), due to field leakage radiation of the vertical slot, the maximum radiation direction is along the -x axis.
The scientists say that in the future, more sensitive radio telescopes, such as the Square Kilometre Array, should be able to detect much weaker radiation, perhaps even unintentional leakage radiation, from civilizations like our own.
In addition, the compact x-band accelerator structure, because it has a small diameter, can be encased in a lead/steel strongback, with sufficient lead surrounding the accelerator structure to dramatically reduce the accelerator leakage radiation. Thus, Mobetron "leakage" radiation is two to three orders of magnitude lower than the leakage radiation from a conventional S-band accelerator.
Scatter radiation and leakage radiation constitute the 2 types of secondary radiation from fluoroscopy.
Picking up this kind of leakage radiation, which weakens rapidly with distance, would probably require aliens to employ a radio telescope larger than any in use now on Earth.
Executive Officer Peter Boyce of the American Astronomical Society in Washington, D.C., who helped draw up the document, observes that scientists could conceivably pick up another civilization's leakage radiation without ever knowing whether it was a deliberate attempt at communication.
However, unfortunately in the present time we must collimate our incident beam very severely to minimize the leakage radiations in order to maintain very low background radiation level in our neutron guide hall to aviod possible influence to neighboring experiments.