doctrine

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doctrine

a creed or body of teachings of a religious, political, or philosophical group presented for acceptance or belief; dogma
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
reasoning behind the Learned Intermediary Doctrine since doctors are
Though the learned intermediary doctrine is well established in both Canada and the United States, there are likely to be some differences in the application of the doctrine even between these two neighboring countries.
The learned intermediary doctrine has been accepted in other countries, such as Canada, where the intermediary has been adequately apprised of the risks, while in other countries, like Norway, the law does not acknowledge this exception to a manufacturer's duty to warn.
The learned intermediary doctrine (LID) is a widely recognized defense in pharmaceutical failure-to-warn litigation.
They include the "bulk supplier" or "raw materials doctrine," the "sophisticated user doctrine," the "learned intermediary doctrine," and the "substantial change in condition" doctrine.
The learned intermediary doctrine, which requires pharmaceutical companies to warn doctors but not patients of a drug's dangers and side-effects, is strong armor against liability for injury caused by drugs.
According to the learned intermediary doctrine, a drug or device manufacturer is protected from liability for injury if it has provided a sufficient warning to the prescribing physician.
In this note, Catherine Paytash examines the validity of the learned intermediary doctrine as it is applied in the context of prescription drug therapy.