Chamaedaphne

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Related to leatherleaf: sheep laurel
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Chamaedaphne

 

(also Cassandra), a genus of evergreen shrubs of the family Ericaceae. The plants are 17 to 100 cm tall. The leathery leaves and the branchlets are covered on both sides with peltate scales. The flowers are white, gamopetalous, urceolate-campanulate, and drooping; they are gathered in unilateral leafy racemes at the ends of the branches. The fruit is a capsule. The genus has one species—the leatherleaf (C. calyculata) —which grows in Northern Eurasia, North America (as far south as the Allegheny Mountains), and, less commonly, Japan. The leatherleaf is typical of tundras and upstream, mainly sphagnum, swamps; it is also found in damp forests and along rivers and lakes. The leaves and young shoots contain the glycoside andromedotoxin, which is poisonous to sheep and goats.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Key words: Amphibian decline, chytridiomycosis, Guatemala, Anura, Plectrohyla, Ptychohyla, leatherleaf fern.
Taxon Date Location Acanthocystis polymorpha 4 May 1994 Lake Monroe (Monroe County) Pinaciophora fluviatilis 28 June 1994 Lake Monroe (Monroe County) Pterocystis fortesca 29 June 1993 Crooked Lake (Whitley County); Kesling Pond, High Lake & Reith Gravel Pit (Noble County) 8 June 1994 Lake Monroe (Monroe County) Raphidocystis flabellata 2 July 1993 Leatherleaf Bog (Noble County) Raphidocystis tubifera 29 June 1993 Reith Gravel Pit & Tamarack Bog 2 July 1993 Leatherleaf Bog (all Noble County) Raphidiophrys intermedia 2 July 1993 Leatherleaf Bog (Noble County)
Three individuals hibernated within 2 m of one another in a Sphagnum mound at the base of a Willow and Leatherleaf clump.
Mean leatherleaf rhizosphere activity at 60.8 nmol [C.sub.2][H.sub.4][g.sup.-1] DM 24 [h.sup.-1] lagged a distant second behind T.
LANDSCAPE NOTES: Leatherleaf Viburnum is popular for its wrinkled, leather-like leaves and abundant red berries that attract birds to the garden.
She carried a cascading bouquet of pastel roses, cattaleya orchids, pink Astilbe, and leatherleaf fern.
Habitat: Most common in leatherleaf (Chamaedaphne calyculata) bogs, but may also occur in fens.
Commonly called leatherleaf viburnum, it bears long, deep green leaves with wrinkled tops and fuzzy undersides.
Instead, the ponds were colonized by sphagnum mosses and heath plants such as leatherleaf. The sphagnum moss consumed what minerals existed and released hydrogen ions producing acidic water.
For more information please contact: International Microwave Power Institute, 10210 Leatherleaf Court, Manassas, VA 20111; phone: 703-257-1415; fax: 703-257-0213; web site: www.impi.org.
Common Names: leather fern, leatherleaf, baker fern