Lust

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Lust

Aeshma
fiend of evil passion. [Iranian Myth.: Leach, 17]
Aholah and Aholibah
lusty whores; bedded from Egypt to Babylon. [O.T.: Ezekiel 23:1–21]
Alcina
lustful fairy. [Ital. Lit.: Orlando Furioso]
Ambrosio, Father
supposedly virtuous monk goatishly ravishes maiden. [Br. Lit.: The Monk]
Angelo
asked by Isabella to cancel her brother’s death sentence, Angelo agrees if she will yield herself to him. [Br. Drama: Shakespeare Measure for Measure]
Aphrodite Porne
patron of lust and prostitution. [Gk. Myth.: Espy, 16]
Armida’s Garden
symbol of the attractions of the senses. [Ital. Lit.: Jerusalem Delivered]
Aselges
personification of lasciviousness. [Br. Lit.: The Purple Island, Brewer Handbook, 67]
Ashtoreth
goddess of sexual love. [Phoenician Myth.: Zimmer-man, 32]
Asmodeus
female spirit of lust. [Jew. Myth.: Jobes, 141]
Balthazar B
shy gentleman afloat on sea of lasciviousness. [Am. Lit.: The Beastly Beatitudes of Balthazar B]
Belial
demon of libidinousness and falsehood. [Br. Lit.: Paradise Lost]
Bess
Porgy’s “temporary” woman; she knew weakness of her will and flesh. [Am. Lit.: Porgy, Magill I, 764–766; Am. Opera: Gershwin, Porgy and Bess]
Brothers Karamazov, The
family given to the pleasures of flesh. [Russ. Lit.: The Brothers Karamazov]
Caro
loathsome hag; personification of fleshly lust. [Br. Lit.: The Purple Island, Brewer Handbook, 180]
Casanova
(1725–1798) loving (and likable) libertine. [Ital. Hist.: Espy, 130]
Cleopatra
(69–30 B.C.) Egyptian queen, used sex for power. [Egyptian Hist.: Wallechinsky, 323]
Don Juan
literature’s most active seducer: “in Spain, 1003.” [Span. Lit.: Benét, 279; Ger. Opera: Mozart, Don Giovanni, Espy, 130–131]
elders of Babylon
condemn Susanna when carnal passion goes unrequited. [Apocrypha: Daniel and Susanna]
Falstaff, Sir John
fancies himself a lady-killer. [Br. Lit.: Merry Wives of Windsor]
Fritz the Cat
a tomcat in every sense. [Comics: Horn, 266–267]
goat
lust incarnate. [Art: Hall, 139]
hare
attribute of sexual desire incarnate. [Art: Hall, 144]
horns
attribute of Pan and the satyr; symbolically, lust. [Rom. Myth.: Zimmerman, 190; Art: Hall, 157]
Hartman, Rev. Curtis
lusts after a young woman viewed at her window, but turns the experience into a hysterical sense of redemption. [Am. Lit.: Winesburg, Ohio]
John of the Funnels, Friar
monk advocating lust. [Fr. Lit.: Gargantua and Pantagruel]
Lilith
sensual female; mythical first wife of Adam. [O.T.: Genesis 4:16]
long ears
symbol of licentiousness. [Indian Myth.: Leach, 333]
Lothario
heartless libertine and active seducer. [Br. Lit.: Fair Penitent, Espy, 129]
Malecasta
personification of wantonness. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
Montez, Lola
(1818–1861) beguiling mistress to the eminent. [Br. Hist.: Wallechinsky, 325]
Obidicut
fiend; provokes men to gratify their lust. [Br. Lit.: King Lear]
Pan
man-goat of bawdy and lecherous ways. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 798]
Paphnutius
monk converts a courtesan but cannot overcome his lust for her. [Fr. Lit.: Anatole France Thaïs in Benét, 997]
pig
attribute of lust personified. [Art: Hall, 247]
Porneius
personification of fornication. [Br. Lit.: The Purple Island, Brewer Handbook, 865]
Priapus
monstrous genitals led him on the wayward path. [Rom. Myth.: Hall, 252]
Ridgeon, Sir Colenso
refrains from using his tuberculosis cure to save the life of a man whose wife he coveted. [Br. Lit.: Shaw The Doctor’s Dilemma in Sobel, 173]
Robinson, Mrs.
middle-aged lady lusts after young graduate. [Am. Lit.: The Graduate; Am. Music: “Mrs. Robinson”]
Salome
in her provocative Dance of the Seven Veils. [Aust. Opera: R. Strauss, Salome, Westerman, 417]
Spanish
jasmine flower symbolizing lust. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 175]
Vathek
devotes his life to sexual and other sensuous indulgences. [Br. Lit.: Beckford Vathek]
Villiers, George
first Duke of Buckingham and libidinous dandy. [Br. Lit.: Waverley]
widow of Ephesus
weeping over her husband’s corpse, she is cheered by a compassionate sentry and they become ardent lovers in the burial vault. [Rom. Lit.: Satyricon]
Zeus
the many loves of this god have made his name a byword for sexual lust. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 297–301]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
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Venal and obsessed with escaping his exile, imposed after he embezzled money from a fund set up to take children to Lourdes, Ted is charged with taking care of feckless loon Father Dougal and alcoholic lecher Father Jack.
The whole point of false courage is to move the conversation away from one's failings to one's strengths: I am an idiot, I am a jerk, I am a lecher, l am a scoundrel, but at least I am man enough to admit it.
Every Christmas, the office lecher will emerge carrying a sprig hoping to snare any unwary female.
Flashman, Brown's one-time school-room nemesis, may be lecher, womaniser, coward and self-confessed poltroon but he is all too candidly human as well.
The end result would grace the wall of any horse lover seeking an antidote to the standard racing calendar - or any old lecher who thinks their wife might fall for the charity excuse and let them hang it in the kitchen.
Yes, your growing sexuality is making even this lecher seem attractive.
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