Lust

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Related to lechery: holey, covetousness

Lust

Aeshma
fiend of evil passion. [Iranian Myth.: Leach, 17]
Aholah and Aholibah
lusty whores; bedded from Egypt to Babylon. [O.T.: Ezekiel 23:1–21]
Alcina
lustful fairy. [Ital. Lit.: Orlando Furioso]
Ambrosio, Father
supposedly virtuous monk goatishly ravishes maiden. [Br. Lit.: The Monk]
Angelo
asked by Isabella to cancel her brother’s death sentence, Angelo agrees if she will yield herself to him. [Br. Drama: Shakespeare Measure for Measure]
Aphrodite Porne
patron of lust and prostitution. [Gk. Myth.: Espy, 16]
Armida’s Garden
symbol of the attractions of the senses. [Ital. Lit.: Jerusalem Delivered]
Aselges
personification of lasciviousness. [Br. Lit.: The Purple Island, Brewer Handbook, 67]
Ashtoreth
goddess of sexual love. [Phoenician Myth.: Zimmer-man, 32]
Asmodeus
female spirit of lust. [Jew. Myth.: Jobes, 141]
Balthazar B
shy gentleman afloat on sea of lasciviousness. [Am. Lit.: The Beastly Beatitudes of Balthazar B]
Belial
demon of libidinousness and falsehood. [Br. Lit.: Paradise Lost]
Bess
Porgy’s “temporary” woman; she knew weakness of her will and flesh. [Am. Lit.: Porgy, Magill I, 764–766; Am. Opera: Gershwin, Porgy and Bess]
Brothers Karamazov, The
family given to the pleasures of flesh. [Russ. Lit.: The Brothers Karamazov]
Caro
loathsome hag; personification of fleshly lust. [Br. Lit.: The Purple Island, Brewer Handbook, 180]
Casanova
(1725–1798) loving (and likable) libertine. [Ital. Hist.: Espy, 130]
Cleopatra
(69–30 B.C.) Egyptian queen, used sex for power. [Egyptian Hist.: Wallechinsky, 323]
Don Juan
literature’s most active seducer: “in Spain, 1003.” [Span. Lit.: Benét, 279; Ger. Opera: Mozart, Don Giovanni, Espy, 130–131]
elders of Babylon
condemn Susanna when carnal passion goes unrequited. [Apocrypha: Daniel and Susanna]
Falstaff, Sir John
fancies himself a lady-killer. [Br. Lit.: Merry Wives of Windsor]
Fritz the Cat
a tomcat in every sense. [Comics: Horn, 266–267]
goat
lust incarnate. [Art: Hall, 139]
hare
attribute of sexual desire incarnate. [Art: Hall, 144]
horns
attribute of Pan and the satyr; symbolically, lust. [Rom. Myth.: Zimmerman, 190; Art: Hall, 157]
Hartman, Rev. Curtis
lusts after a young woman viewed at her window, but turns the experience into a hysterical sense of redemption. [Am. Lit.: Winesburg, Ohio]
John of the Funnels, Friar
monk advocating lust. [Fr. Lit.: Gargantua and Pantagruel]
Lilith
sensual female; mythical first wife of Adam. [O.T.: Genesis 4:16]
long ears
symbol of licentiousness. [Indian Myth.: Leach, 333]
Lothario
heartless libertine and active seducer. [Br. Lit.: Fair Penitent, Espy, 129]
Malecasta
personification of wantonness. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
Montez, Lola
(1818–1861) beguiling mistress to the eminent. [Br. Hist.: Wallechinsky, 325]
Obidicut
fiend; provokes men to gratify their lust. [Br. Lit.: King Lear]
Pan
man-goat of bawdy and lecherous ways. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 798]
Paphnutius
monk converts a courtesan but cannot overcome his lust for her. [Fr. Lit.: Anatole France Thaïs in Benét, 997]
pig
attribute of lust personified. [Art: Hall, 247]
Porneius
personification of fornication. [Br. Lit.: The Purple Island, Brewer Handbook, 865]
Priapus
monstrous genitals led him on the wayward path. [Rom. Myth.: Hall, 252]
Ridgeon, Sir Colenso
refrains from using his tuberculosis cure to save the life of a man whose wife he coveted. [Br. Lit.: Shaw The Doctor’s Dilemma in Sobel, 173]
Robinson, Mrs.
middle-aged lady lusts after young graduate. [Am. Lit.: The Graduate; Am. Music: “Mrs. Robinson”]
Salome
in her provocative Dance of the Seven Veils. [Aust. Opera: R. Strauss, Salome, Westerman, 417]
Spanish
jasmine flower symbolizing lust. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 175]
Vathek
devotes his life to sexual and other sensuous indulgences. [Br. Lit.: Beckford Vathek]
Villiers, George
first Duke of Buckingham and libidinous dandy. [Br. Lit.: Waverley]
widow of Ephesus
weeping over her husband’s corpse, she is cheered by a compassionate sentry and they become ardent lovers in the burial vault. [Rom. Lit.: Satyricon]
Zeus
the many loves of this god have made his name a byword for sexual lust. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 297–301]
References in periodicals archive ?
14) Near the beginning of this lengthy poem, the seven daughters of sin come to their wedding mounted on animals: Pride is on a lion, Envy on a dog, Anger on a boar, Sloth on an ass, Avarice on a horse ("baucan"), Gluttony on a wolf, and Lechery on a goat.
6] While the trademark lechery of his early career suggests that he represented a threat to women, DeVito's characters most often represent threats to power relations and normative masculinity.
Many allegations have been made about Rumkowski's character: greed, corruption and lechery (Bloom, 1949), (Weingarten in Adelson and Lapides, 1989:492), pedophilia (Eichengreen and Fromer, 1999), and that he was a "sadist-moron" (Sierakowiak, in Adelson and Lapides, 1989:156).
Barker's was English humour spreading with his smile from the bottoms and the boobs on the sand, through an examination of our absurd class system - the dark sarcasm which scrapes pompous authority; the defiance of Fletch in Slade Prison, always outwitting Mr McKay and quelling the violence of "genial Harry Grout"; the cunning lechery and pennywatching of Arkwright the shopkeeper.
They were assigned qualities that embodied everything colonists and later settlers feared becoming or succumbing to in the vast, alien wilderness: paganism, lechery, brutality, cruelty, indolence, treachery and so on.
At the end of Part 1 of Goethe's Faust the antihero Faust wakes up after his Walpurgisnacht debauchery to a grey morning and the realization that his lechery has caused Gretchen to be hounded out of society and incarcerated as a criminal.
Thus is Pepys's frenzied lechery evoked in one delightful, albeit barely intelligible, quotation: "mi mano was sobra her pectus, and so did hazer with grand delight.
Lechery, cowardice, senile weakness, low cunning, and wounded pride are all displayed in the manner of puppet theater, with decisive figuration and vigorous grace seemingly more valued than nuance or ambiguity.
17) Martin Ingram has noted "a sizeable minority of men" arrested for lechery in fifteenth-century London, and argued that the 1690-1730s reformation of manners campaigns were not especially unique.
This raises important questions relating to cultural syncretism and the appropriate use by body modifiers of certain indigenous cultural practices, which, some claim, 'excite some dark dregs of lechery and cruelty in us, holding our eyes fixed with repugnance and lust' (p.
Despite its murky image and legal problems, thousands of new businesses have sprung up in the last five years, offering all the eye popping lechery that money can buy.