lectin


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Related to lectin: lecithin

lectin

[′lek·tən]
(biochemistry)
Any of various proteins that agglutinate erythrocytes and other types of cells and also have other properties, including mitogenesis, agglutination of tumor cells, and toxicity toward animals; found widely in plants, predominantly in legumes, and also occurring in bacteria, fish, and invertebrates.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Immunohistochemically, lectin activity was also seen in the half-month of ebner (serous demilune), pars initialis, pars secretory and pars excretory (Figs.
Low level concentration of mannose binding lectin has been proposed to be a risk factor for miscarriage (4).
Govaerts, "Role of mannose-binding lectin (MBL2) genotyping in predicting the risk of recurrent otitis media (rOM)," Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol.
Lectins are proteins that are found in most plants.
The penetration of the active contents of the extracts and lectin in nutrient agar was compared to ampicillin, which used as positive control because of the similarity of [beta]-lactam ring present in ampicillin and ring structures of amino acids.
It's critical to note that the majority of lectin studies have been done with isolated lectins, not actual foods, and have been conducted in test tubes or in animals, not in people.
Turner, "Mannose-binding lectin: the pluripotent molecule of the innate immune system," Immunology Today, vol.
Immunomodulatory activities of Agaricus bisporus lectin (ABL) from edible mushroom acted on innate and adaptive immune responses in vivo and in vitro but showed an inhibitory and antiproliferative effect on macrophages.