left-handedness


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Related to left-handedness: Lefthanded, Right handed

left-handedness:

see handednesshandedness,
habitual or more skillful use of one hand as opposed to the other. Approximately 90% of humans are thought to be right-handed. It was traditionally argued that there is a slight tendency toward asymmetrical physiological development favoring the right side of the
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They were combined in order to examine questions about the stability of handedness with age, sex and secular trend toward increasing left-handedness (Annett, 1998).
In Bambach's essay on Leonardo's left-handedness in the hefty exhibition catalogue, she points out that he was well known as a southpaw, despite negative attitudes about this characteristic in his time.
The researchers stated, "The present results suggest a 30 percent increase in left-handedness among boys prenatally exposed to ultrasound.
Although the statistic that places the incidence of left-handedness in the Kerr family at 29% has been disputed (Keele, 1974), it suggests an interesting relationship between handedness and the design of human spaces.
Weighing left-handedness on the canvas, Demonstrably yours, Cy.
Between 1982 and 1989 he entered competitions and won numerous awards with his high-tech boomerangs and off-beat throwing style, which derived from his left-handedness.
uk/ginger-health-are-redheads-more-likely-to-be-left-handed/) left-handedness is a recessive trait , with an estimated (http://www.
While the genetic bases of handedness are still under debate, scientists obtained indirect evidence of a hormonal mechanism promoting left-handedness among men.
Youdale, jocularly likened to Spaniard Rafael Nadal by teammates and coaches for his left-handedness, claims the strength in depth of the squad was the key factor in comfortably claiming the title this term.
That since some watershed moment, be it in 1976 or whenever, left-handedness had stopped being seen as a mildly interesting genetic variation and quietly morphed into being seen as a disability.
Two Northwestern University researchers now report that a high degree of cooperation, not something odd or sinister, plays a key role in the rarity of left-handedness.