legalism

(redirected from legalisms)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

legalism

strict adherence to the law, esp the stressing of the letter of the law rather than its spirit
References in periodicals archive ?
(22) These arguments are in the service of Shklar's main thesis, a critique of "legalism"--the ideology under which the rule of law becomes an end in itself rather than a means to the accomplishment of liberal values--and the legalistic view that all political trials are objectionable because they violate legal norms.
Striking a blow for clean water - and defying a powerful bully's legalisms - 'The Mountain Citizen' proves worthy of its name
After discussing the Marian tale as genre, he devotes one chapter each to five sets of examples and demonstrates how Marian piety comforted multiple audiences faced with the increasingly stringent, distancing legalisms of the Gregorian Revolution.
On honoring the Geneva agreement, Bush said he would ''listen to all of the legalisms'' and announce a decision later.
Mr Bush said: "I'll listen to all the legalisms and announce my decision."
Such legalisms may be necessary because gay men and lesbians are protected against employment discrimination in New York City and because Tove Luth, the woman who held the general manager position just prior to Bell, is also suing Helmsley, charging that she was paid less than men in comparable jobs at the company.
"I hope the Congress does not get caught up in the stale, old process argument of the legalisms involved with encouraging organizations of faith to help people in need," Bush said.
A system of justice, it seems to me, should not be based on technicalities and legalisms. A just system of justice would expect that a lawyer who knows that his client is guilty should recuse himself from continuing to defend his client.
Our times still try to hide behind legalisms and euphemisms, but what they cover up are more serious matters than ever.
A president captive to legalisms forces us to hem in the office of the presidency with laws.
Portia explicitly begs Antonio to make the theoretical Christian move beyond law for which she is better known to audiences than for her contractual legalisms. She asks him to undo the legalistic persecution of the Alien Statute by reducing its effect on his enemy: "What mercy can you render him, Antonio?" (IV.
"In and of itself the ethical falls away into lifeless legalisms. But when persons enter upon the redeemed way of life through faith in Jesus Christ, and then seek in every area of experience to do the right and the good as a faithful reflection of their new relation to God, their ethics is simply redemption come to its proper unfolding" (p.