legitimate


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.

legitimate

1. authorized, sanctioned by, or in accordance with law
2. of, relating to, or ruling by hereditary right
3. of or relating to a body of famous long-established plays as distinct from films, television, vaudeville, etc.
References in classic literature ?
Elizabethan prose, all too chaotic in the beauty and force which overflowed into it from Elizabethan poetry, and incorrect with an incorrectness which leaves it scarcely legitimate prose at all: then, in reaction against that, the correctness of Dryden, and his followers through the eighteenth century, determining the standard of a prose in the proper sense, not inferior to the prose of the Augustan age in Latin, or of the "great age in France": and, again in reaction against this, the wild mixture of poetry and prose, in our wild nineteenth century, under the influence of such writers as Dickens and Carlyle: such are the three periods into which the story of our prose literature divides itself.
Letton has pointed out, the thing is legitimate and square.
"Well, and the most legitimate desire--he wishes that your children should have a name."
A few Senators and legitimate capitalists were lifted up as the figureheads of the crusade.
It will be well if they are not able to counteract its legitimate and necessary authority.
You know the direct, legitimate fruit of consciousness is inertia, that is, conscious sitting-with-the-hands-folded.
Nor will there ever be wanting to a prince legitimate reasons to excuse this non-observance.
This grief for his home, which overcomes so many married seamen, did not deprive Captain MacW- of his legitimate appetite.
The Republic of Plato is also the first treatise upon education, of which the writings of Milton and Locke, Rousseau, Jean Paul, and Goethe are the legitimate descendants.
Hargrave's anxiety to make good matches for her daughters is partly the cause, and partly the result, of these errors: by making a figure in the world, and showing them off to advantage, she hopes to obtain better chances for them; and by thus living beyond her legitimate means, and lavishing so much on their brother, she renders them portionless, and makes them burdens on her hands.
"You are the son of King Louis XIII., brother of Louis XIV., natural and legitimate heir to the throne of France.
You are so intelligent, how is it you don't see that if the count has written a letter to the Emperor begging him to recognize Pierre as legitimate, it follows that Pierre will not be Pierre but will become Count Bezukhov, and will then inherit everything under the will?