legitimate

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legitimate

1. authorized, sanctioned by, or in accordance with law
2. of, relating to, or ruling by hereditary right
3. of or relating to a body of famous long-established plays as distinct from films, television, vaudeville, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The delegitimators outscored the legitimators and they positioned themselves as citizens belonging to member states and having a personal authority regarding this issue.
A significant aspect of Wallace's approach is his suggestion that ultimately "Buddhism" can help inform and progress "Science." As David McMahon (3) and Donald Lopez (4) have elsewhere noted, a common trope of the dialogue between Buddhism and Science is that the latter is typically heralded as the legitimator of Buddhism--in that exchange the epistemic authority gets displaced from Buddhist texts and teachers onto the scientist, who can validate and confirm the tradition's claims.
(95.) See McDorman, supra note 63, at 319-20 (stating that the Commission plays the role of "legitimator").
More important, by the middle 1960s, he had become the "Great Legitimator." If the newspaper coverage of his ministry serves as a reliable index, his presence conferred sanctity on events, authority on presidents, acceptability on wars, desirability on decency, shame on indecency, and prestige on dessert recipes.
As Hobsbawm suggests, history serves as "a legitimator of action and cement of group cohesion" that can "give any desired change (or resistance to innovation) the sanction of precedent, social continuity and natural law as expressed in history." (8) As we will see again with the Women's Coronation Procession, two historical types proved especially useful in performing the functions of legitimation and unification in the suffrage pageants: powerful women who have succeeded in roles traditionally held by men and women martyrs who have been victims of male oppression or cruelty.
(83) Penn appears to believe that by removing the persecution weapon out of its traditional rhetorical circuit, it will cease to function as a legitimator of aggressive counter-action, and that as a result revenge will be morally unavailable as a course of action.
The same ambivalence is legible through Shakespeare's long reign as a worldwide cultural idol, proffered as a means of self-improvement for the working classes, but also wielded as a legitimator of traditional class distinctions.
But to what extent can one agree with her that "it is conceivable that the dogaressa symbolized a civic male-female partnership as much as or in addition to male dominance of females" (121) or that "the dogaressa may have appeared at many of the state's crucial religious festivals, in her role as observer and legitimator" (89)?
Conclusions in these works dovetail well with earlier work on tradition and memory, suggesting that people strive to establish continuity with a suitable historic past in order to "use history as a legitimator of action and cement of group cohesion." See Eric Hobsbawm and Terence Ranger, eds., The Invention of Tradition (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ.