Fitzgerald contraction

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Fitzgerald contraction:

see Lorentz contractionLorentz contraction
, in physics, contraction or foreshortening of a moving body in the direction of its motion, proposed by H. A. Lorentz on theoretical grounds and based on an earlier suggestion by G. F.
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FitzGerald contraction

See Lorentz–FitzGerald contraction.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, John Bell in [15] relates the problem of the thread tied between two spaceships and whether the thread will break at relativistic speeds due to length contraction. He insists that it will--he relates how "[a] distinguished experimental physicist refused to accept that the thread would break, and regarded my assertion, that indeed it would, as a personal misinterpretation of special relativity".
In a nutshell, time dilation and length contraction are apparent effects.
Furthermore, given that the 'relative space' in S is isotropic, k must be an even function of v, since otherwise the length contraction factor determined by (11a) is anisotropic.
Einstein derived length contraction and time dilation as effects originating in special relativity.
Parker's account of length contraction is competent enough; he makes the important point that the contraction is neither an optical illusion nor a physical contraction (in the sense of atoms being squeezed).
Section 8 addresses the question how the physical phenomena of length contraction and time dilation constrain the coordinate transformations.
Defined in these terms, length contraction and time dilation constitute real processes of dynamic origin, connected with the impact of absolute motion on molecular forces.
By doing so we replace the use of the relativistic length contraction by counting charges.
In 2002 it was discovered that the Michelson-Morley 1887 light-speed anisotropy experiment, using the interferometer in gas mode, had indeed detected anisotropy, by taking account of both the Lorentz length contraction effect for the interferometer arms, and the refractive index effect of the air in the light paths [3,4].
In 2002 it was discovered that the Michelson-Morley 1887 light-speed anisotropy experiment [1], using the interferometer in gas mode, had indeed detected anisotropy, by taking account of both a physical Lorentz length contraction effect for the interferometer arms, and the refractive index effect of the air in the light paths [2, 3].
What not has been considered in this explanation is the effect of length contraction. According to Einstein's special relativity, the measured length changes with the same factor as the measured time, if the frame of reference is changed by modifying relative speed between observer and object.
But it is absolute motion which causes the dynamical effects of length contractions, time dilations and other relativistic effects, in accord with Lorentzian interpretation of relativistic effects.