lessor


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lessor

a person who grants a lease of property

lessor

The person granting a possessory interest in buildings, property, etc., by lease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the challenges aircraft lessors will need to navigate over the coming years include industry cyclicality, geopolitical risk, oil price volatility, competitive pressures on underwriting standards, funding and placing the delivery of large aircraft order books, residual value risk associated with older model planes, and rising interest rates.
It includes access to The Global Lessor Network (GLN), standardized contracts, expert support, and outsourcing services.
In considering the tax treatment we have considered the tax treatment of the lessors assuming that the lessor is not in the same jurisdiction of the lessee.
The lease agreement between the lessor and the lessee requires that the lessee acquire an insurance policy for the vehicle that identifies the lessor as the named/additional insured.
Residual value--resale value of a car at lease end, as determined by the lessor.
RENEWAL AND PURCHASE OPTIONS: Renewal or purchase options - and the length of notice you have to give the lessor before you exercise these options - may be defined in the lease.
Since in this case major risk is borne by the lessor, so the equipment that the lessor chooses is of that kind that in case if the lessee terminates the lease, the lessor will be in a position to lease that equipment to another party easily.
The tax consequences to the lessor and lessee of a rent holiday will generally be governed by Internal Revenue Code (IRC) Section 467.
On the other hand, a uniform federal disclosure scheme for lease-purchase agreements that provides key information to consumers without causing a substantial compliance burden to lessors might prove beneficial, provided the various parties affected by such legislation can identify a genuine need for it.
In this case, the lessor recognizes periodic rent as income and the lessee recognizes the rent as expense.
Despite near-term risks in the airline operating environment (particularly in Europe) and threats to the global economy, Fitch expects lessors to benefit from longer term growth opportunities and improved access to capital as the structure of the industry evolves.
While some lessors in China have already registered over the last few years using the English version of the Global Lessor Network, we expect registrations to grow much more quickly because lessors can now register in Chinese.