leukosis


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Related to leukosis: Leucosis, lymphoid leukosis

leukosis

[lü′kō·səs]
(medicine)
An excess of white blood cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
The present survey showed that free-ranging chickens of Anhui province have been exposed to lymphoid leukosis virus subgroup A, indicating a high risk factor for poultry industry.
Hematological changes associated with enzootic bovine leukosis in cattle from Timis County.
Part 2: suitable for the detection of antibodies from milk as enzootic bovine leukosis virus (BLV) ELISA test against;
In 1970, MC29 avian leukosis virus (an RNA virus) was found to cause mesotheliomas in 35% of chickens inoculated with the virus into the peritoneal, pericardial, and air sac cavities.
It is mentioned as a vector of a role of diseases (Avian leukosis, Gumboro, Marek's, and Newcastle disease, smallpox, Avian influenza, coronavirus, and other bacterial diseases) (Watson et al.
Lymphoid leukosis in Asian Houbara Bustards in the U.
He discusses how experimental leukemia research started and developed, the progress of cancer concepts, early research, research on avian leukosis and sarcoma virus, mouse and rat viruses, studies on stem cells and cytokines, viral and chemical carcinogenesis, cell cycle control and centrosome, important oncogenes and suppressor genes and the related cell biology, skin carcinogenesis, DNA viruses, and the common pathway for retroviruses and chemicals.
The physical transition from corruption to purity, from nigredo to leukosis, is evident in the restoration of "la neige des chairs" (2: 86).
Avian leukosis (loo-ko-sihs) Marek's disease and lymphoid leukosis are two forms of avian leukosis, and are caused by different viruses.
Some of the samples collected for brucellosis were also tested to demonstrate freedom from enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) and warble fly, and therefore this surveillance will also cease.
Irrefutable evidence does confirm that the nonhuman retroviruses avian leukosis virus (ALV), bovine leukemia virus (BLV), feline leukemia virus (FeLV), and murine leukemia virus (MuLV) induce lymphoproliferative disease in birds, cattle, cats, and mice, respectively; all are usually associated with T-cell leukemias.