levator

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Related to levator muscle: Levator ani muscle, Levator scapulae muscle

levator

[lə′vād·ər]
(medicine)
An instrument used for raising a depressed portion of the skull.
(physiology)
Any muscle that raises or elevates a part.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
NSARP technique as an extension of PSARP described by Dave has the advantages of posterior sagittal incision with better delineation of anatomy without cutting the levator muscle and it also preserved the perineal skin.
After the release of orbital fat adhesion, we remeasured the prolapse distance of upper eyelid and the function of levator muscle intraoperatively in the supine position.
During the preoperative assessment the levator muscle's function and the severity of the ptosis were evaluated.
Lee makes the following observation on surgical intervention: in congenital ptosis, the levator muscle is infiltrated with fat and fibrosis and is basically non-functional, so the eyelid is most commonly suspended from the adjacent frontalis muscle using a sling.
We used a weight about 0-2 gm heavier than that determined by testing the force with assumption that this would help strengthen the levator muscle.
In sum, the paired levator muscles are the primary muscles of closure but other muscles contribute differentially during speech production.
She uses the power of her levator muscle to shoot her lids wide open.
The levator muscle can be evaluated on vaginal exam by pressing gently with one finger at both 4 o'clock and 8 o'clock.
When this occurs, surgical reattachment of the levator muscle is required to correct the drooping eyelid.
Each segment has a depressor and a levator muscle (similar to the second antenna) (3); the antagonistic muscles in the distal segment control the flicking motion.
The injuries require adequate layer by layer inspection of the wound to assess the integrity of the orbital septum, levator muscle and levator aponeurosis, conjunctiva, rectus muscle, and the globe.
In addition, an involvement of the EOMs in orbital lymphomas tends to occur in the superior rectus muscle and levator muscle (Table 1) [3-5].

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