levator

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Related to levator muscle: Levator ani muscle, Levator scapulae muscle

levator

[lə′vād·ər]
(medicine)
An instrument used for raising a depressed portion of the skull.
(physiology)
Any muscle that raises or elevates a part.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lee makes the following observation on surgical intervention: in congenital ptosis, the levator muscle is infiltrated with fat and fibrosis and is basically non-functional, so the eyelid is most commonly suspended from the adjacent frontalis muscle using a sling.
sup][2],[3],[4] Grove [sup][1] previously reported on fatty infiltration between the levator muscle and Muller's muscle, connective tissue proliferation forming adhesions to the levator muscle, and degenerative changes within the levator muscle.
Recession of the levator muscle was done while removing the two implants to induce ptosis and help cover the exposed cornea in these two patients.
In sum, the paired levator muscles are the primary muscles of closure but other muscles contribute differentially during speech production.
She uses the power of her levator muscle to shoot her lids wide open.
Congenital blepharoptosis results from a developmental dystrophy of the levator muscle of unknown aetiology.
This is brought about by ligaments and muscles; the levator muscle and its attachment to the lid (the aponeurosis)
In addition, if the genital hiatus (levator hiatus) is closed at the time of colpectomy, a separate anti-incontinence procedure is rarely needed because the urethrovesical angle is supported by the approximation of the levator muscle.
Jobe first suggested the placement of a gold weight into the upper eyelid to assist closure by counteracting the normal levator muscle retraction.
Congenital ptosis is commonly caused by a developmental dystrophy of the levator muscle, which elevates the upper eyelid and is present since birth.
sup][1],[2] The well-established explanation has been the inadequate resection of the lesion in the APR, which usually creates a stricture at the levator muscle level.
Intraoperatively, it was observed that the vessels lying between the Muller's muscle and levator muscle were greatly enlarged.

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