levee

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levee

(lĕv`ē) [Fr.,=raised], embankment built along a river to prevent flooding by high water. Levees are the oldest and the most extensively used method of floodflood,
inundation of land by the rise and overflow of a body of water. Floods occur most commonly when water from heavy rainfall, from melting ice and snow, or from a combination of these exceeds the carrying capacity of the river system, lake, or the like into which it runs.
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 control. They are constructed by piling earth on a surface that has been cleared of vegetation and leveled. From a broad base the levee narrows to a flat crown, on which sandbags or some other temporary protection may be placed to contain unusually high waters. Levee surfaces are commonly protected from erosion by vegetation, notably Bermuda grass. A banquette, or low terrace of earth, is usually added on the land side of high levees to prevent loss of material from the slope through rain erosion. On the river side, plantings of willows, weighted brush matting, or concrete revetments protect those sections of levee that are exposed to strong waves or currents, while ditches or drainage tiles keep the foundation from becoming waterlogged. Levee systems require careful planning, with sections set back from the river to form a wider channel and with flood valley basins divided by cross levees to prevent inundation of large areas by a single break. The most extensive levee systems in the United States are along the Mississippi and Sacramento rivers and their tributaries. The dikes of Holland are a form of levee, and levee-type embankments are used along the Danube, Vistula, Po, and other European rivers.

Levee

 

a hydraulic regulating structure, usually a low earthen dam, designed to protect riparian land from inundation during seasonal or flash flooding of rivers. Levees are built chiefly on the floodplains of rivers. They receive the pressure of the water only periodically, when the level rises above the banks.

levee

[′lev·ē]
(civil engineering)
A dike for confining a stream.
A pier along a river.
(geology)
An embankment bordering one or both sides of a sea channel or the low-gradient seaward part of a canyon or valley.
A low ridge sometimes deposited by a stream on its sides.

levee

1 US
an embankment alongside a river, produced naturally by sedimentation or constructed by man to prevent flooding

levee

2
1. a formal reception held by a sovereign just after rising from bed
2. (in Britain) a public court reception for men, held in the early afternoon
References in periodicals archive ?
Critics have pointed to the inadequacy of the levees lining the riverbanks of the Mississippi and its tributaries throughout the Midwest.
Because of the length and the sensitivity of the delta and its levees, Michels made the decision to use HDD hole intersect technology.
On the basis of changes in measured apparent resistivity traces places where occur inhomogeneities in examined section of levee can be found.
Some of the borings drilled within the levees and the underlying foundation soils encountered loose sand layers.
In 2008, the Corps will begin a risk assessment of all 2,000 levees in its inventory for design issues.
Levees and dams, considered "hard" flood control, are politically popular, yet approximately one third of all flood disasters in the United States are caused by levee failures.
"Plaintiffs are not seeking damages for the failure of the levees or flood projects," he wrote.
Meanwhile, Widin said insurers "will be trying very hard to show" the levees breached because flood waters overtopped them--a natural flood excluded by the policy language Duval did not find ambiguous.
Scientists have long said that the only way to restore Louisiana's vanishing coastline is to undo the elaborate levee system and divert the river to the sediment-starved marshes below New Orleans to the southeast.
Hanson, research leader at the ARS Hydraulic Engineering Research Unit in Stillwater, Oklahoma, uses a water jet pumping at various flow rates to give a rapid determination of the erodibility of soil used in structures like levees.
"[T]here are only two kinds of levees, those that have failed and those that will fail." (1)
Now comes the re-evaluation of Arkansas' long-neglected levee system, which will surely seek to address at least two big public policy questions: Who should be responsible for the levees?