level of free convection


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level of free convection

[′lev·əl əv ‚frē kən′vek·shən]
(meteorology)
The level at which a parcel of air lifted dry and adiabatically until saturated, and lifted saturated and adiabatically thereafter, would first become warmer than its surroundings in a conditionally unstable atmosphere. Abbreviated LFC.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

level of free convection

level of free convection
If a dry mass of air is lifted from A to B adiabatically it will tend to come down from its position B to position A. However, if it becomes saturated at B and rises to C, it will continue to rise.
The level at which a parcel of air lifted dry adiabatically becomes saturated. It would then rise moist adiabatically and being warmer than the surrounding atmosphere would continue to rise in a conditionally unstable atmosphere. The dry adiabatic lapse rate is the rate of decrease of temperature with the height of a parcel of dry air lifted adiabatically. It is equal to 3°C/5.4°F per 1000 ft (9.767°C/km). ELR is the environmental lapse rate (i.e., the actual rate of decrease of temperature in the atmosphere).
 
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
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At 1200 UTC around the time of the passage of the rainband over Fuzhou, the CAPE increased to about 561 J [kg.sup.-1] with the level of free convection at about 1,450 m.
1979), or a MCV (e.g., Schumacher and Johnson 2009) are primarily responsible for lifting air to its level of free convection over a relatively large area and for many hours.