leverage


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Related to leverage: Leverage ratio, Financial leverage

leverage

1. the action of a lever
2. the mechanical advantage gained by employing a lever
3. the enhanced power available to a large company
4. the use made by a company of its limited assets to guarantee the substantial loans required to finance its business

Leverage

The use of fixed-cost funds to acquire property that is expected to produce a higher rate of return either by way of income or through appreciation.

leverage

[′lev·rij]
(mechanics)
The multiplication of force or motion achieved by a lever.
References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords Leverage * Banking * OBS activities * Liquidity * Kalman Filter
To achieve the third goal of creating a site that showcased Burby Engineering's experience and expertise, Leverage Digital Media strategically placed high-resolution photos of projects throughout the site, so that every page would display one of the firm's past or present projects.
Also, Leverage CUs on the Ventelligence vendor contract program have experienced a 25.5% savings on commodity purchases, while a link to Sprint Mobile Services generated $300,000 in noninterest income to participating CUs during 2009.
Leverage fired the shotgun in the air when he was told the system was computerised and could not be accessed with keys.
This strategy allows for use of the gift tax exemptions, and provides significant leverage for creating wealth.
A firm that has all of its assets financed by equity has a leverage of 1.0, which simply means that ROE will exactly equal ROA.
A clear objective is to leverage the collective intellect of the organization to advance organizational learning and community innovation.
As JDST's 29.46% loss over the past week confirms, being short miners with leverage when gold rises can be a punishing trade.
In Leverage over the Life Cycle and Implications for Firm Growth and Shock Responsiveness (NBER Working Paper No.
The program will be financed with incremental non-recourse borrowings at Trinity Industries Leasing Company (TILC) and will result in modestly higher leverage at TILC.
This study compares leverage ratios across cities to see where borrowers are stretching the most to purchase a home.
A common element in all of these settings is that if the regulator can attach conditions to the exercise of its gatekeeping authority, it can leverage outcomes that it might not be able to impose directly or could only accomplish at a much higher cost.