libel


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libel

1. Law
a. the publication of defamatory matter in permanent form, as by a written or printed statement, picture, etc.
b. the act of publishing such matter
2. Ecclesiastical law a claimant's written statement of claim
3. Scots law the formal statement of a charge
References in periodicals archive ?
Rappler yesterday questioned the NBI decision to revive the cyber libel complaint that it earlier dismissed.
Also slapped with libel complaints are Doctors Francisco Cruz, Teodoro Herbosa and Anthony Leachon.
This is the third complaint for libel against Cruz.
To the contrary, libel and slander laws should be repealed.
libel laws can be strengthened after a new book questioned his mental fitness to serve as president.
Trump had called for changing the country's libel laws even when he was a presidential candidate.
A LARGE libel payout awarded to Kate and Gerry McCann will help fund the search for their missing daughter Madeleine.
He said the press had this leeway because under the Times decision, a public official must not only prove the falsity of an allegation in a libel action but must also show negligence and "actual malice.
Lawmakers today moved to decriminalize libel by abolishing the penalty of imprisonment provision under the Revised Penal Code.
MOST people will be uneasy about the decision of Carmarthenshire County Council to fund its chief executive in bringing a libel action against a blogger.
Privacy & Libel Law: The Clash with Press Freedom" analyzes the role of law in today's rising debate over libel and concerns over privacy, and the heavy influence of lobbyists into this debate, focusing not only on concerns in America, but as well as the United Kingdom and other areas of the world.
A new Philippine cybercrime law drastically increases punishments for criminal libel and gives authorities excessive and unchecked powers to shut down websites and monitor online information," HRW said.