libel

(redirected from libels)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms.
Related to libels: slander, defaming

libel

1. Law
a. the publication of defamatory matter in permanent form, as by a written or printed statement, picture, etc.
b. the act of publishing such matter
2. Ecclesiastical law a claimant's written statement of claim
3. Scots law the formal statement of a charge
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Are there actual blood libels being leveled against Jews today?
Jacobson argues that some accusations that are not classical blood libels can still be reasonably described that way, since the essence of the blood libel is "taking an issue that has nothing to do with reality" and connecting it to nonexistent Jewish guilt.
"It was entirely focused on the effects of the libels on our other children and the damage that was done in the search for Madeleine."
Unfortunately, O'Brien's book seeks refuge in the general over the specific, and, as such, misses an opportunity to say something truly thought-provoking about blood libels as fascinating instances of imaginative violence.
His claim was that they contained "grave and offensive" libels which "seriously injured" his reputation.
In addition, the program restated numerous old libels and lies, such as Israel is planning to destroy the al Aqsa Mosque, The Jewish holy Temple was not on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem, Israel desecrated the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, and many others.
Animosities in Marlowe's play anticipate criticism of the Jacobean Bedchamber in part because Marlowe was responding to libels provoked by innovations in the chamber politics of the French king Henri III that also anticipate Jacobean practice.
The ISP claimed the defense of "innocent dissemination", the recourse of most ISPs to protect themselves from the myriad potential libels hosted on their servers.
A traditional news organization like the Times can be held legally and financially responsible for any libels its reporters generate because the Times has editorial policies and an editorial hierarchy ensuring that nothing will appear in the newspaper that its editors have not approved before publication.
He claimed they contained "grave and offensive" libels.
Chief Justice Ronan Keane said that the libel, although serious and justifying an award of substantial damages, "cannot be regarded as coming within the category of the grossest and most serious libels, which have come before the courts".
Blasphemous libel, defamatory libel, and corrupting children are three crimes which seem to not fit with our current age and conceptions of what is criminal and what is not.