libido

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libido

(lĭbē`dō, –bī`–) [Lat.,=lust], psychoanalytic term used by Sigmund Freud to identify instinctive energy with the sex instinct. For Freud, libido is the generalized sexual energy of which conscious activity is the expression. C. G. Jung used the term synonymously with instinctive energy in general. Many psychiatrists now feel that Freud overemphasized the concept of libido as the determinant of personality development and did not adequately emphasize the results of socializing forces. The term drive is often used instead of libido but without the sexual implications of the latter. See psychoanalysispsychoanalysis,
name given by Sigmund Freud to a system of interpretation and therapeutic treatment of psychological disorders. Psychoanalysis began after Freud studied (1885–86) with the French neurologist J. M.
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Libido

 

one of the basic concepts of psychoanalysis, developed by S. Freud.

According to Freud, the libido is a primarily unconscious drive of a sexual character. Unlike the urge for self-preservation, the libido may be repressed or undergo complex transformation. Freud believed that the libido is localized in different zones of the body during the process of individual development, determining the phases of psychosexual development and the respective changes in the objects of attraction (from autoeroticism to attraction to external objects). Upon encountering an external obstacle, the libido may return to past stages of development, acquiring the form of pathological regression. At the same time, it may turn away from the original goals and find expression in the processes of creativity (sublimation).

In a polemic with Freud, C. G. Jung reexamined the concept of libido. Jung denied the libido an exclusively sexual character, considering it psychic energy generally. Understood in this way, the libido appears in Jung’s theory as a metaphysical principle of the psyche and a basic psychic reality. In Jung’s idealistic treatment, this is an autonomous, closed system, functioning on the basis of the principle of compensation.

D. N. LIALIKOV

libido

[lə′bē·dō]
(psychology)
Sexual desire.
The sum total of all instinctual forces; psychic energy or drive usually associated with the sexual instinct.

libido

Psychoanal psychic energy emanating from the id
References in periodicals archive ?
Masochistic fantasies would merely provide a means for subjects to invert and libidinally bind their more fundamental "life" energies.
This was his dream-imagery repertoire of which the most frequent and libidinally most intensely charged was the wild-fowl eggs vision.
More interesting is Funk's return to discussions about what it means to look libidinally at passive, attractive bodies arrayed for us by a painter who has also, by implication, looked at, framed, and possessed them.
Stephan Oettermann's wonderful book may therefore be as much about time as space, a time that still had time for moments of arrested motion and visual contemplation, a time before the eye was thrust back into a libidinally charged body continuous with networks of information and stimulation, where all terrains seem equally false.
And this wonderworld is libidinally lazy--no one hits up on anyone and sex is only ever for other people, on some other TV channel.
The building blocks of development--early identification, sublimation, superegoic sadism--get libidinally mixed up between couplification and group processes.
5) Recalling that Ferenczi, the originator of the term "introjection," identified it as a normal process by which libidinally charged objects are gradually included within the ego which is thereby enlarged and enriched (see Ferenczi), Abraham and Torok elaborated, explaining that it is also the process by which a necessary alteration in the ego's topography is effected so that the reality of a loss may be integrated within the psyche.
These stones are usually extracted from the body of a sick person by the NGANGKARI (healer), but, libidinally charged in the dreams, they represent the male phallus (and testes) in both its life-giving and life-destroying capacity:
See also Grosz: "External objects, implements and instruments with which the subject continually interacts become, while they are being used, intimate, vital and even libidinally cathected parts of the body image.