libido

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libido

(lĭbē`dō, –bī`–) [Lat.,=lust], psychoanalytic term used by Sigmund Freud to identify instinctive energy with the sex instinct. For Freud, libido is the generalized sexual energy of which conscious activity is the expression. C. G. Jung used the term synonymously with instinctive energy in general. Many psychiatrists now feel that Freud overemphasized the concept of libido as the determinant of personality development and did not adequately emphasize the results of socializing forces. The term drive is often used instead of libido but without the sexual implications of the latter. See psychoanalysispsychoanalysis,
name given by Sigmund Freud to a system of interpretation and therapeutic treatment of psychological disorders. Psychoanalysis began after Freud studied (1885–86) with the French neurologist J. M.
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Libido

 

one of the basic concepts of psychoanalysis, developed by S. Freud.

According to Freud, the libido is a primarily unconscious drive of a sexual character. Unlike the urge for self-preservation, the libido may be repressed or undergo complex transformation. Freud believed that the libido is localized in different zones of the body during the process of individual development, determining the phases of psychosexual development and the respective changes in the objects of attraction (from autoeroticism to attraction to external objects). Upon encountering an external obstacle, the libido may return to past stages of development, acquiring the form of pathological regression. At the same time, it may turn away from the original goals and find expression in the processes of creativity (sublimation).

In a polemic with Freud, C. G. Jung reexamined the concept of libido. Jung denied the libido an exclusively sexual character, considering it psychic energy generally. Understood in this way, the libido appears in Jung’s theory as a metaphysical principle of the psyche and a basic psychic reality. In Jung’s idealistic treatment, this is an autonomous, closed system, functioning on the basis of the principle of compensation.

D. N. LIALIKOV

libido

[lə′bē·dō]
(psychology)
Sexual desire.
The sum total of all instinctual forces; psychic energy or drive usually associated with the sexual instinct.

libido

Psychoanal psychic energy emanating from the id
References in periodicals archive ?
After all, Freud famously argues in a footnote in Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality that just about any artistic representation is libidinally driven, for there is "no doubt that the concept of the 'beautiful' " in relation to aesthetic theory "has its roots in sexual excitation and that its original meaning was 'sexually stimulating' " (69).
The imputation of libidinal value is one this protagonist would extend from his idol to himself: conflating his libidinally invested scholarly object with himself (as subject), the narrating protagonist equates 'knowledge' with identity --and exclusive rights of possession: "the world, as I say, had recognised Jeffrey Aspern, but Cumnor and I had recognised him most" (1984: 47).
Intra-psychically the experience was wholly real: qua the spirit imago QANG effectively became libidinally disinvested (decathected) from his treasured feminine object and it stopped appearing and narcissistically-libidinally feeding him.
The supposed sexual guile of the women of the new land, that enables them to deceive, kill, dismember, and eventually eat a European man, not only feeds the vivid collective imagination of the European world regarding alien cultures, but also becomes synonymous with the dangers inherent in a libidinally excessive and sexually uncontrolled female "other.
Redemptive wandering could then be understood as much in physical as discursive terms, as the ultimate goal is freedom from the lure of the "religion spermatique" of the libidinally overdetermined Xantippe.
This points to the fact that the body "as such" is already libidinally charged.
Utopias based on this dream of emotional satisfaction have more substantial expressions, for example in Fourier's matrices of carefully matched passions required for his Phalansteries, in the utopia of artistry and unalienated labor of Morris' News from Nowhere, and in Marcuse's visions of a libidinally liberated society.
19) Falstaff attempts to live out a carnival ideal suffused with a libido that is among the most successfully communicated of the multiple associations swirling around the remarkable prose Shakespeare has written for him, (20) and this libidinally charged speech is perhaps the key feature behind the centuries-old legion of followers and champions of Falstaff who have responded to the multivalent and subversive richness of passages such as the following, in which his powers of self-fictionalization are fully operative:
As a result, women are both disgusted with and frightful of themselves--ontologically, libidinally, aesthetically.
Eros, the instinct of life to be libidinally bound to another, is in direct contrast to the death instinct, manifested by our destructiveness and aggressive hostility "against all and of all against each" (Civilization 69).
More so than any other image of Held I've seen, this costume suggests just how libidinally suggestive it probably was for a "white" chorus girl to repeatedly deploy "black" messages-vocally and physically-in whiteface.
In these at first glance innocuous picture books, the pagan energy that has ruled postwar America comes roaring back, making the Waldo series easily the most libidinally explosive books since Goodnight Moon.