libido


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to libido: impotence, testosterone

libido

(lĭbē`dō, –bī`–) [Lat.,=lust], psychoanalytic term used by Sigmund Freud to identify instinctive energy with the sex instinct. For Freud, libido is the generalized sexual energy of which conscious activity is the expression. C. G. Jung used the term synonymously with instinctive energy in general. Many psychiatrists now feel that Freud overemphasized the concept of libido as the determinant of personality development and did not adequately emphasize the results of socializing forces. The term drive is often used instead of libido but without the sexual implications of the latter. See psychoanalysispsychoanalysis,
name given by Sigmund Freud to a system of interpretation and therapeutic treatment of psychological disorders. Psychoanalysis began after Freud studied (1885–86) with the French neurologist J. M.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Libido

 

one of the basic concepts of psychoanalysis, developed by S. Freud.

According to Freud, the libido is a primarily unconscious drive of a sexual character. Unlike the urge for self-preservation, the libido may be repressed or undergo complex transformation. Freud believed that the libido is localized in different zones of the body during the process of individual development, determining the phases of psychosexual development and the respective changes in the objects of attraction (from autoeroticism to attraction to external objects). Upon encountering an external obstacle, the libido may return to past stages of development, acquiring the form of pathological regression. At the same time, it may turn away from the original goals and find expression in the processes of creativity (sublimation).

In a polemic with Freud, C. G. Jung reexamined the concept of libido. Jung denied the libido an exclusively sexual character, considering it psychic energy generally. Understood in this way, the libido appears in Jung’s theory as a metaphysical principle of the psyche and a basic psychic reality. In Jung’s idealistic treatment, this is an autonomous, closed system, functioning on the basis of the principle of compensation.

D. N. LIALIKOV

libido

[lə′bē·dō]
(psychology)
Sexual desire.
The sum total of all instinctual forces; psychic energy or drive usually associated with the sexual instinct.

libido

Psychoanal psychic energy emanating from the id
References in periodicals archive ?
Melatonin also has a role to play in libido - and appetite.
Jo Begley is the urology clinical nurse specialist at The James Cook University Hospital and runs clinics targeting loss of libido, as well as other sexual problems.
The Sex-StarvedMarriage: A Couple's Guide to Boosting Their Marriage Libido by Michele Weiner Davis, is published by Simon & Schuster,priced pounds 10.
So, you'd think we'd support medical efforts to help improve women's libidos ...
A ram with good libido should be able to mate two ewes straight away, providing the ewes are ready for mating.
NHP Libido Support This botanical formula contains damiana, Siberian ginseng and other ingredients selected by fertility expert Dr Marilyn Glenville.PS27.77 for 60 capsules from naturalhealthpractice.com.
"So I thought I would write a symphony of five movements about people coping with a condition, whatever it is, but still responding to libido in one way or another.
New Delhi [India], Jan 23 ( ANI ): Loss of libido (sex drive) is a common problem that can affect men and women of any age.
In a new study, researchers found water extract of unripe plantain peels inhibits key enzymes linked to poor libido and prevent oxidative stress in rats' penile tissue.
"Supplements are becoming mainstream as more and more couples look to boost libido and enjoy a more satisfying sex life," Albrecht says.
Libido calculated at different age groups showed that older animals having age above five years exhibited the best libido (P1, P2 and P3) compared to the younger animals.