Shape

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Shape

Implies a three-dimensional definition that indicates outline and bulk of the outlined area.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

shape

1. Any of a number of metal bars or beams of uniform section, as an I-beam.
2. To cut a profile or detail, as a beaded or rounded edge on a board.
3. To work a material to a required pattern, as on a shaper.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
D26975_14; D26975_3; D26975_; D26975_7; D26975_10; D26975_22; D26975_23; D26975_20 WHEEL POWER: Little Euan Keith, aged 3, couldn't resist getting to grips with one of the big boys' toys at the show and jumped behind the wheel of a tractor on one of the many trade stands AT A GALLOP: England took on the rest of the world in a polo match in the grand ring (below) SO COOL: Ben Mudd and his mum Yvonne find some shade and a hay bale to take a break from the sun and cool off LICKED INTO SHAPE: Jackie and Mike Coulter, of the Brinklow and Warks Re-enactment Society find relief in a couple of ice creams as they realise that it is not the weather for thick uniforms LED BY THE NOSE: The livestock take to the ring (above) and (below) Leslie Cook presents Albany for inspection in the cattle shed
For a while at least a pampered life of a Royal will come to an end, though some members of Sandhurst think it might take the Royal rebel a long 44 weeks to be licked into shape. Sympathy?
Roared on by the tremendous Toon Army, United snarled and snapped at Sir Alex Ferguson's side as Graeme Souness licked into shape what was left of his squad.
(xv) Suffice it to read the expressive titles of the thirteen chapters of this absorbing book to anticipate the joy that awaits us: Love, Death and Biscuits; Magical Metal, Silly Saints and Risible Relics: the Art and Artefacts of Popular Religion; Licked into Shape: Animal Symbolism; Why Englishmen Have Tails: Race, Nationality and Monstrosity; Signs of Infamy: The Iconography of Humiliation and Insult The Fool and the Attributes of Folly; Shoeing the Goose: Proverbs and Proverbial Follies; Nonsense, Pure and Applied; Narratives--Heroic and Not So Heroic; Hearts and Flowers and Parrots: the Iconography of Love; Who Wears the Trousers: Gender Relations; Wicked Willies with Wings: Sex and Sexuality; Tailpiece: the Uses of Scatology.