licorice


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licorice

(lĭk`ərĭs, –rĭsh), name for a European plant (Glycyrrhiza glabra) of the family Leguminosae (pulsepulse,
in botany, common name for members of the Fabaceae (Leguminosae), a large plant family, called also the pea, or legume, family. Numbering about 650 genera and 17,000 species, the family is third largest, after the asters and the orchids.
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 family) and for the sweet substance obtained from the root. Since early times the root has been used medicinally (for coughs and as a laxative); it is used also in brewing, for confectionery, and for flavoring (e.g., in some tobacco). The licorice plant, a perennial with blue pealike blossoms, is cultivated chiefly in the Middle East. Another species, the wild licorice (G. lepidota), is native to North America; other plants of similar flavor may be called licorice. Licorice is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Leguminosae.

licorice

[′lik·rəs]
(botany)
Glycyrrhiza glabra. A perennial herb of the legume family (Leguminosae) cultivated for its roots, which when dried provide a product used as a flavoring in medicine, candy, and tobacco and in the manufacture of shoe polish.

liquorice

(US and Canadian), licorice
1. a perennial Mediterranean leguminous shrub, Glycyrrhiza glabra, having spikes of pale blue flowers and flat red-brown pods
2. the dried root of this plant, used as a laxative and in confectionery
References in periodicals archive ?
Out of 120 eligible patients, 110 patients completed the study complying with the prescribed medications and follow-up; 54 patients were assigned to the licorice group (LR) and 54 patients to the control group (schematic presentation of study groups is illustrated in Fig.
In a second part to the study, authors then compared the effect of licorice (100 mg/kg BW) on alcohol-induced fatty liver with silymarin (100mg/kg BW) as a positive control, which is known to alleviate alcohol-induced liver injury.
The licorice category doesn't need just another fruit-flavored licorice.
I am far from an expert on female behavior, but I am reasonably sure the following items have much greater appeal than sticky, chewy licorice candy.
While adding licorice to one's diet may be a sweet temptation, researchers caution that this is not a cure for diabetes; rather, the amorfrutins must be extracted and produced in appropriate concentrations in order to be beneficial.
Since this research is new, you may not find many dental products on the market containing licorice root.
As visceral fat is significantly involved in developing metabolic syndromes, and with obesity, slimming and weight management being major driving forces in today's markets, products containing Kaneka's licorice extract promise great potential.
Traditional medical practitioners use dried licorice root to treat various ailments, such as respiratory and digestive problems, but few modern scientific studies address whether licorice really works.
Along with the support of Finnish sports stars Hyypia and racing driver Mika Hakkinen, celebrity icons Madonna, Brad Pitt and Anne Hathaway are all said to be fans of licorice.
Liverpool John Moores University graduate Lisa Gawthorne has spent more than four years working on the marketing of the licorice products, both for UK distributors and for the Finnish parent company, Oy Panda.
Nice licorice base, and licorice all through," said Tom Conti.