licorice


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licorice

(lĭk`ərĭs, –rĭsh), name for a European plant (Glycyrrhiza glabra) of the family Leguminosae (pulsepulse,
in botany, common name for members of the Fabaceae (Leguminosae), a large plant family, called also the pea, or legume, family. Numbering about 650 genera and 17,000 species, the family is third largest, after the asters and the orchids.
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 family) and for the sweet substance obtained from the root. Since early times the root has been used medicinally (for coughs and as a laxative); it is used also in brewing, for confectionery, and for flavoring (e.g., in some tobacco). The licorice plant, a perennial with blue pealike blossoms, is cultivated chiefly in the Middle East. Another species, the wild licorice (G. lepidota), is native to North America; other plants of similar flavor may be called licorice. Licorice is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Leguminosae.
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licorice

[′lik·rəs]
(botany)
Glycyrrhiza glabra. A perennial herb of the legume family (Leguminosae) cultivated for its roots, which when dried provide a product used as a flavoring in medicine, candy, and tobacco and in the manufacture of shoe polish.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

liquorice

(US and Canadian), licorice
1. a perennial Mediterranean leguminous shrub, Glycyrrhiza glabra, having spikes of pale blue flowers and flat red-brown pods
2. the dried root of this plant, used as a laxative and in confectionery
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the initial agreement, Azerbaijani supplier will export 2,500-3,000 tons of high quality licorice products to Israel starting from the next season.
Mix half a tablespoon of honey and licorice powder in a glass of lukewarm water
The 84-year-old man visited the emergency department for a high-blood pressure emergency, which was found to be induced by consuming homemade tea made from licorice root.
Licorice consumption as a cause of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: a case report.
After a month of treatment Licorice made a full recovery and although she was healthy enough to find a new home we didn't feel she was quite ready due to how nervous she was.
pylori resistance against antibiotics and the effectiveness of licorice for treating H.
Derived from licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra L.) via an advanced patented process, Glavonoid is 100% free from glycyrrhizinic acid and contains 30% licorice glabra polyphenols.
It flows through the cavity and emerges as liquid licorice."
The result showed that licorice (Radix glycyrrhizae) was the most frequently used herb in Chinese Formulae Database, other frequently used herbs including Radix Angelicae Sinensis (Dang gui), Radix et rhizoma ginseng (Ren shen), etc.
The mineralocorticoid stimulation by licorice is reversible, usually recovering within days, but may be sustained for several weeks according to amount taken and individual susceptibility3