life raft


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life raft

a raft for emergency use at sea

life raft

[′līf ‚raft]
(naval architecture)
A very buoyant raft designed to be used by people forced into the water; made of a metal tube covered with wood or canvas, of balsa wood, or of rubber which may be automatically inflated.
References in periodicals archive ?
Then there are the Coastmaster[R] range of life rafts, manufactured and certified to standard ISO 9650-3 --the international coastal life raft specification.
This empty life raft, believed to have fallen off a merchant ship during Storm Imogen, was recovered by Porthcawl RNLI STEVE JONES/PORTHCAWL RNLI
"Taking part in fundraising activities, such as the life raft challenge, means that the lifeboat crews can continue to reunite the 22 people they rescue each day with their families."
A coastguard spokesman said: "After a navy warship relocated the overturned sailing vessel on Friday, search planners confirmed the boat's life raft was secured in its storage space in the aft portion of the boat, indicating the crew had not been able to use it for emergency purposes."
Daniel being the youngest, we put him in the life raft first.
Approximately five minutes passed between first spotting them to deploying the first life raft. It took another 10 minutes until we had the two functioning life rafts that we dropped close by in the water.
The life raft is composed of what you give your attention to--how you direct your awareness either will sink you or keep you afloat.
Thank you for the image of the life raft! For sure, it is an image of staying afloat a little more securely than being just a body floating ...
If you ditch in the middle of the Atlantic, even with a personal ELT with built-in GPS, you may find that your life raft is a home-away-from-home for an extended period.
Her father, Laurence Sunderland, said that he didn't know if his daughter was in a life raft or aboard the boat, or whether the boat was upside down.
Mr Griffin, one of two members of the extreme-right party elected to the European Parliament last month, said occupants of sunk boats could be given life rafts to get back to Africa.