lifting condensation level

lifting condensation level

[′lift·iŋ ‚kän‚den′sā·shən ‚lev·əl]
(meteorology)
The level at which a parcel of moist air lifted dry adiabatically would become saturated. Abbreviated LCL. Also known as isentropic condensation level (ICL).

lifting condensation level

The level at which a parcel of unsaturated dry air lifted dry adiabatically becomes saturated. See also dry adiabatic lapse rate and adiabatic.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Lifting Condensation Level (LCL) is the height at which a parcel of air becomes saturated when lifted dry adiabatically.
These tornadoes often reside in miniature supercells in an environment characterized by a high low-level moisture content, a low lifting condensation level, a small surface dewpoint depression, small or moderate convective available potential energy (CAPE), and enhanced low-level shear due to increased surface friction from water to land, as well as boundary layer convergence (Green et al.
2), including a moderate CAPE (~1284 J [kg.sup.-1]), a low lifting condensation level (~389 m), a small surface dewpoint depression (~3 K), a large veering low-level (0-3 km) vertical wind shear (~22.3 m [s.sup.-1]), and a large cell-relative helicity (-211 [m.sup.2] [s.sup.-2]), meet the "high threat" category of a TC-spawned tornado in the United States (McCaul 1991; Schneider and Sharp 2007).