light curve


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light curve

A graph of the brightness of a variable star or other variable object plotted against time, the brightness usually being expressed in terms of apparent or absolute magnitude. Different types of variable star can be distinguished by the shape of the curve; the period of the variable is one complete oscillation in brightness. The light curve of an eclipsing binary has two minima: a shallower one (the secondary minimum) and a deeper one (the primary minimum), which occurs when the brighter star is eclipsed. The minimum has a flat base if the eclipse is total or annular.

light curve

[′līt ‚kərv]
(astrophysics)
A graph showing the variations in brightness of a celestial object; the stellar magnitude is usually shown on the vertical axis, and time is the horizontal coordinate.
References in periodicals archive ?
The characteristics of Barnard's Star allowed the team to infer the properties of KOI-961, which is needed to deduce the nature of the planetary system from the star's light curve, a plot of how the star dims over time due to transiting planets.
Moreover, its light curve -- the variation of its brightness with time -- had an unusual shape.
Tenders are invited for Repair/ Replacement Of Damaged Ac Sheet And North Light Curve Of Buildings Inside Factory At Vfj.
It's true that copernicus123 first noted that this star's light curve displayed a "bizarre peak--a giant transit." However, numerous scientists as well as citizen scientists had already examined the Kepler observations, even if only as part of a larger dataset.
Sound wave conversions of the light curve waves created by stars discovered by NASA's Kepler mission and other sounds of planets and stars
The intricate light curve of that event suggested more than 30 separate ring structures in a disk 1.2 a.u.
The only oddity of SN 2011fe will prove to be of the most value to researchers as the light curve of the supernova did not fit any previous graphs and it could not be stretched to match past standards.
Hubble sent a letter, along with a light curve of V1, to Shapley telling him of his discovery.
David Arnett of the University of Chicago pointed out, they can extrapolate the supernova's light curve, its graph of brightness over time, back to an appropriate starting point at the moment IMB and Kamiokande recorded their neutrinos, so they feel that was the moment the explosion began.
The dips lasted from days to weeks and showed no regularity in duration, periodicity, or the "shape" of the light curve.
The UV spectroscopy was also used to calculate a light curve to precisely show just how much of the star's light is blocked out during transit.
While the results show a rather scattered light curve (see https://is.gd/r6L08J, third image), they confirmed the period of the brightness variations known since the 1970s.