light exposure

light exposure

[′līt ik‚spō·zhər]
(optics)
A measure of the total amount of light falling on a surface; equal to the integral over time of the luminance of the surface. Also known as exposure.
References in periodicals archive ?
The study is the first to assess the hormonal impact nighttime light exposure can have on young children.
It's also been reported that artificial light is correlated with type 2 diabetes in the home setting and that daytime light exposure is positively correlated with body mass index.
Given that light exposure from being outside is generally much brighter than light received indoors, the addition of artificial bright light each morning helps cancer survivors reduce fatigue and improve their sleep quality by strengthening their circadian rhythms.
DDL is now offering photostability testing at its Eden Prairie, MN lab facility to assess the response to light exposure of pharmaceutical and combination products, cosmetics and other products.
This information was compared to light exposure at night from satellite data obtained from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP).
The study cited is the first research to measure personal circadian light exposure in office workers by using a device calibrated to measure circadian-effective light.
All current popular milk packaging systems allow for certain light exposure to occur.
The goal of shade clothing is to decrease morning and early afternoon temperatures, lowering light exposure in the fruit zone," Overholt wrote in the project proposal.
Night light exposure has also been linked to obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and other heart diseases.
Too much light exposure particularly at night especially blue light that comes from LED and screen has resulted in profound changes in human behavior and created hazards to health.
4 will include Night Shift mode to the Macs, which will let users reduce blue light exposure.
The Lighting Resource Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute responded, saying that the light exposure metrics in the report were misused and over-simplified and that conclusions that LEDs cause circadian disruption, melatonin suppression and decreased vision are all unfounded.