light freeze

light freeze

[′līt ¦frēz]
(meteorology)
The condition when the surface temperature of the air drops to below the freezing point of water for a short time period, so that only the tenderest plants and vines are adversely affected.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most brassicas are fairly cold-tolerant, and Brussels sprouts even benefit in flavor from a light freeze. When temperatures sink toward, or slightly below, freezing, row covers will help protect the crops.
It may bring a light freeze at higher elevations, but the lunar apogee should weaken the strength of that system elsewhere.
Depending on exactly where you live, your garden may have been exposed to a light freeze (36 to 32 degrees) or a temperature more extreme during the nights leading up to the harvest moon.
Tender plants can be protected from light freezes by covering them with sheets, plastic or boxes.
A strobe light freezes the soloist midair, so that the dancer appears to be defying gravity, walking, skipping, and leaping through space without ever pushing off from the ground.