lightning stroke


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lightning stroke

[′līt·niŋ ‚strōk]
(geophysics)
Any one of a series of repeated discharges comprising a single lightning discharge (or lightning flash); specifically, in the case of the cloud-to-ground discharge, a leader plus its subsequent return streamer.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Numeral analysis Model for shielding failure of transmission line under lightning stroke", IEEE Trans.
Thus, the transient potential responses can be given for the different positions on the WT under lightning stroke.
Due to the highly-cost apparatus, utilized in substations, insulation coordination of substations comprises a wide range of influential factors, including estimation of apparatus electrical strength, in terms of BIL (basic lightning impulse insulation level) and BSL (basic switching impulse insulation level), minimum required clearances, in which arcing is avoided, lightning arresters' rating, number and location, shielding against lightning strokes using overhead ground wires and masts, open breaker protection, influences of contamination and atmospher c conditions on insulation strength, etc.
4 were applied in numerical modeling of lightning stroke to the tower in order to estimate the level of threat to the telecommunication equipment (the ideal current source located at the tower top).
In a lightning stroke, a gargantuan surge of current flows through the trail from a cloud to the ground.
Franklin was struck by the similarity to a tiny lightning stroke and an equally tiny crack of thunder.
"This gigantic jet carried as much charge to the upper atmosphere as the very biggest cloud-to-ground lightning strokes, about a hundred to a thousand times bigger than a typical lightning stroke," Cummer said.
The manner in which a lightning stroke, or a single match, can burn down an entire forest is an example of a chemical chain reaction.
On average, a lightning stroke in Florida packs almost twice the electric current of one in New England, reports Richard E.
Due to the small distance between the earth wire and the line wires, a direct lightning stroke hits usually the line wires as well.
In analysis, the surge current 100 kA (peak values) and shape 10/350 [micro]s was used for simulation the first lightning stroke.