lignify

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Related to lignified: lignin

lignify

[′lig·nə‚fī]
(botany)
To convert cell wall constituents into wood or woody tissue by chemical and physical changes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jinyuan###Mostly two layers of closely spaced lignified globular sclerenchymatous cells###Fig.
The analysis of mesophyll type, lignified cell type, vascular bundle type, and sclerenchyma sheaths shared along the mid-vein are commonly used for identifying species of the genus (Yates & Duncan 1970, Guaglianone & Gattuso 1991, Marquete & Pontes 1994, Gattuso 1995, Martins & Appezzato-da-Gloria 2006, Guimaraes et al.
2A) appeared to have less lignified tissue in the crown core than cold-hardened crowns (Fig.
The epidermal cells possess thick and lignified tangential and radial walls as well as the outer tangential walls covered by cutin like-deposition (Fig.
Monocots usually have a reduced, poorly lignified vascular system, which leads to the degeneration of some xylem conducting elements without affecting the transportation function (Bristow, 1975).
In physiologically ripe fruits, the galleries only reach the pericarp, the interior of the fruit being protected by the lignified mesocarp, which acts as a barrier to the larvae, allowing the fruit to continue its growth, reach maturity, and be successfully harvested if fungal infections do not occur.
In YL, the vascular system is poorly developed, the vessel elements were thin-walled and the periciclic fibers were not lignified yet (Fig.
Since the 2006 harvest, Cartwright has searched for a more accurate way to determine the maturity of varietals than peering through a refractometer or squeezing a grape to see if a seed lignified and turned brown.
Lignified dietary fiber also plays an important role in maintaining gastrointestinal function and health in humans (Ferguson et al.
The resin was found to penetrate into the lignified cell walls with the S3 and middle lamella (ML) layers having significantly higher resin concentrations than the S2 layer.
Since the stems have more lignified cell walls, they remain a longer time in the rumen, a fact which may limit forage ingestion (Decruyenaere, Buldgen & Stilmant, 2009).