lignocellulose


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lignocellulose

[¦lig·nō′sel·yə‚lōs]
(biochemistry)
Any of a group of substances in woody plant cells consisting of cellulose and lignin.
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The lignocellulose index integrates these variations, showing increased values in remaining straw according to the increase the decomposition (Fig.
ARBOCEL lignocellulose is made from selected, untreated and carefully dried natural wood.
The close relationship of lignocellulose with microorganisms that exist in the nest reinforces the idea that these organisms have a high ability to produce a series of catalytic enzymes and degrade polymers, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, existing on the substrate on which they grow.
Acidic and mesophillic enzymes are very useful as it helps in simultaneous sacchrification and fermentation of lignocellulose (Duan et al.
Effects of lignocellulose degradation products on ethanol fermentations of glucose and xylose by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zymomonas mobilis, Pichia stipitis, and Candida shehatae.
Therefore, it can be employed to improve the biodegradability of lignocellulose waste materials and improving the production of biogas, consequently (Figures 10-15) [21, 23].
Rice Husk is essentially made up of lignocellulose (72-85 wt%) and silica (15-28 wt%).
Among different white rot fungi Pleurotus species have been described as best laccase enzyme producers because of its capability to secrete oxidative and hydrolytic enzymes which are responsible for lignocellulose degradation (Penninckx et al.
They describe biopolymer modification methods to enhance the compatibility, flexibility, enhanced physicochemical properties, thermal stability, impact response, and rigidity of materials like chitosan, agar-based graft copolymers, lignocellulose fibers, degradable poly(3-hydroxyalkanoates), starches, natural fibers, and cellulose nanocrystals, and tissue engineering and drug delivery, biomedical and environmental, biological, food and non-food, and other applications.
3,4,5,6) In nature, lignocellulose containing organic matter is converted in different phyco-chemical and biochemical degradation process into simple compounds.
Lignocellulose is the major structural component of woody and non-woody plants and represents an important source of renewable organic matter.